A Heal the Bay Halloween at Home

What’s spookier than Halloween? Plastic pollution!

Trash in the ocean and in our neighborhoods, especially single-use plastic waste, negatively impacts public health, water quality, our food supply, marine ecosystem health, and our carbon footprint.  Plastic is made from fossil fuels, and toxic pollution from its extraction, development and manufacturing disproportionately impact People of Color and low-income communities. ⁣

Around the globe, we produce 300 million tons of plastic annually, 50% of which is used for disposable items. That number is only expected to jump, as Big Plastic pushes their agenda and pumps up plastic production to make up for fuel price losses during COVID-19. ⁣

While we’ll keep doing cleanups to pick up the plastic pieces that have already made their way into our environment, a better solution is to shift away from single-use and move toward a thriving culture of reuse.

Help protect our planet! Reduce plastic pollution this Halloween by taking part in our at-home virtual Halloween Challenges below. Tag #healthebayhalloween on social media, so we can “sea” your creepy creations! We’ll feature a few on our feeds, too.

And, tune in to Heal the Bay Aquarium’s Facebook channel on October 31 at 1:00pm for a virtual Spooktacular Saturday Storytime with a family-friendly reading of “The Garbage Monster” by Joni Sensel.

Sustainable Costume Challenge

Calling all frightfully fintastic Halloween a-fish-ianados! Instead of buying a new costume that will come wrapped in plastic packaging – opt for a DIY look. Make a costume with reused, repurposed or upcycled materials from home, local thrift stores, or any items you can find.

Come on, unleash your kraken of creativity. Create a light saber using the force (of a flashlight and rolled up paper) or swim around your living room with a shark fin made of cardboard, cloth, and safety pins.

Plastic-Free Trick or Treat Challenge

We’re seriously scared by how much single-use food and candy wrappers are in our environment. In the last 5 years, 48,015 food and candy wrappers were picked up by cleanup volunteers in Los Angeles County.

⁣Don’t let the ghost of plastic’s past come back to haunt you. In-person trick-or-treating may be cancelled this year, but we can still enjoy some Halloween favorites at home. Whip up some delicious homemade Halloween candy, purchase candy in recyclable or reusable paper boxes, or opt to give some fun goodies like an ocean animal plush keychain that supports your favorite local nonprofit.

Trash Art Challenge

Conduct your own neighborhood or community cleanup, and turn that gross plastic pollution into trash art. Reuse the materials you find to create a garbage monster, sculpture, mosaic, homage to your favorite artwork, or anything you choose—there’s an ocean of creativity that awaits. Remember to wash your hands, avoid using any hazardous materials, and clean the trash before you get to work.

Get Inspired with our Gallery of Ideas

<
>
Photo Credit: Washed Ashore, Smithsonian's National Zoo

More Family-Friendly Ways to Get Involved: