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Heal the Bay Blog

See the full Gala Photo Album (Michel Guyon & John Salangsang of Line8 Photography)

What a night!!聽 Thank you to all who were a part of the celebration. Your generous support of the Bring Back the Beach 2023 Gala enables Heal the Bay to continue (and expand) our mission to make coastal waters and watersheds in Greater Los Angeles safe, healthy, and clean. Guests enjoyed drinks, dancing and a one-of-a-kind experience in the Time to Act Augmented Reality Tents all at the iconic Jonathan Club right on the beach in Santa Monica.

Bring Back the Beach was a tremendous success, raising critical funds to reinforce our work!

With your support the event raised more than 馃帀$925,000馃帀exceeding all expectations and allowing Heal the Bay to continue our mission to #protectwhatyoulove: our irreplaceable Southern CA watersheds and coastal waters.

We were delighted you were part of the celebration honoring Assemblywoman Luz Rivas with the Dorothy Green Award; Amy Liu, Founder Tower 28 Beauty, with the Wave Award; and Jan & Marsh Mokhtari, Co-Founders Gray Whale Gin, with the Walk the Talk Award (Images below).聽 We also hope you had fun!

 

Check out the Bring Back the Beach Gala Flickr for even more pictures of the spectacular celebration.

A tidal wave of thanks to all the elected officials who came out to show their environmental support for our coastline from #Summit2Sea:

馃敺Assemblymember Luz Rivas

馃敺Assemblymember Mike Fong

馃敺Senator Ben Allen

馃敺Assemblymember Laura Friedman

馃敺Assemblymember Al Muratsuchi

馃敺Assemblymember Jaqui Irwin

馃敺Assemblymember Lisa Calderon

馃敺LA City Katy Yaraslovsky, 5th聽Council District

A Great Wave of Gratitude for our Special Supporters

Thank you once again to our special supporters–without whom this magical night would not have been possible–for being part of the movement to improve LA from summit to sea!

Liquid IV

LAcarGUY

Gregory Willis Air Lease Corporation

Laura Woeste Air Lease Corporation

Laura Woeste Air Lease Corporation

Dan Bunce Brown and Caldwell

Gray Whale Gin

Craig Perkins The Energy Coalition

Marsh Mokhtari Gray Whale Gin

Adam Sullins Latham & Watkins LLP

Robin Onkka GHD Ticket

Beverley Stinson AECOM

Amy Bowers Arcadis

Audi Pacific Donation

Jim Clark Black & Veatch

Leneyde Chavez Carollo Engineers

Melissa Ferguson CDM Smith

Kristi Steinberg Ernst & Young Donation

Ian Eddleston EY

Ian Eddleston EY

Donna Bloom-Crook HDR Engineering, Inc.

Brandon Ramirez Hyundai Motor America

Brandon Ramirez Hyundai Motor America

Rich Nagel Jacobs

Larry Witzer Johnny Carson Foundation

Pamerla Perez LA Sanitation

Los Angeles Department of Water & Power

Nikita Lingenfelter McCarthy Construction

Adel Hagekhalil Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

Sharon Lawrence

Camela Ott None

Richard Katz Richard Katz Consulting, inc.

Venu Kolli Stantec Consulting

Greg Morena The Albright

Adam Galia The Boeing Company

Kari Boiler The Boiler Family Trust

Arie Harel The Walsh Group

Amy Liu Tower 28

Toyota Santa Monica

Bob Kane World Surf League

Katy Fox Donation BOA

Madelyn Glickfeld

Brian O’Malley

David Weil Harvard-Westlake School

Hampik Dekermenjian Hazen and Sawyer

Chris Minton Larry Walker Associates

Maribeth Tan Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts

Caitlin Ishigooka Southern California Edison

Luciana Brafman Time to Act Entertainment

Nichol Shuart Wells Fargo Capital Finance

SEE THE GALA JOURNAL

2023 GALA PHOTO ALBUM

JOIN THE 2024 GALA GUESTLIST

 



Nick Gabald贸n Day will take place on Saturday, June 3, 2023, from 9AM – 4:30PM. Sign up for FREE Surf Lessons or REGISTER to Volunteer.聽

Celebrating Nick Gabald贸n

Nick Gabald贸n (1927-1951) was a pioneering surfer of Mexican and African American descent. He was the first documented surfer of color in the Santa Monica Bay. Gabald贸n鈥檚 passion, athleticism, discipline, love and respect for the ocean live on as the quintessential qualities of the California surfer.

In 2013, with the help of African American historian Alison Rose Jefferson, Heal the Bay joined forces with the Black Surfers Collective to amplify and expand their prior Nick Gabald贸n efforts. Nick Gabald贸n Day is now in its 11th year, and will be held on June 3, 2023, as a collaboration of organizations gather together to honor this great legacy that left ripples throughout many communities. 鈥婽heSurf Bus Foundation is another essential organization to the structure and safety of Nick Gabald贸n Day 2023, empowering people to have a healing connection to the sea by engaging in ocean sports like surfing.

This innovative and collaborative celebration provides an amazing opportunity for broadening outreach, action, and education to connect Angelenos with their cultural, historical, and natural heritage.

Sign up for FREE Surf Lessons or REGISTER to Volunteer.聽

We are excited this year to welcome LA28.聽 The LA28 Olympic and Paralympic Games will celebrate our community’s diversity and creativity to collectively design a Games we all want to be a part of.聽 The Games are organized by an independent, non-profit, private organization that partners with private and public entities to deliver the Games. Participants will have an opportunity to meet and hear inspirational stories from Olympic athletes.聽

Once Upon a Beach, in the Face of Adversity

The shoreline and waters at Bay Street in Santa Monica were an active hub of African American beach life during the Jim Crow era. This beach was popular from the 1900s to early 1960s among African American people, who sought to avoid hostile and racial discrimination they might experience at other southland beaches. Racial discrimination and restrictive covenants prevented African Americans from buying property throughout the Los Angeles region, but their community鈥檚 presence and agency sustained their oceanfront usage in Santa Monica.

In 2008, the City of Santa Monica officially recognized the 鈥淚nkwell鈥 and Nick Gabald贸n with a landmark monument at Bay Street and the Oceanfront Walk. In 2019, this same beach was listed as the Bay Street Beach Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places for its significance in the African American experience and American history.

A Beach Day For All: June 3, 2023

Nick Gabald贸n Day introduces young and old from inland communities to the magic of the coast through free surf and ocean safety lessons, beach ecology exploration, and a history lesson about a man who followed his passion and a community who challenged anti-Black discrimination to enjoy the beach.

Sign Up For Free Surf Lessons

Register to Volunteer

The Black Surfers Collective, Heal the Bay, Surf Bus Foundation, and the Santa Monica Conservancy collaborate for Nick Gabald贸n Day to reach families in resource-challenged communities and to connect them with meaningful educational programming. Together, we are helping build personal experiences with cultural, historical, natural heritage, and civic engagement that make up the foundation of stewardship, and the development of the next generation of heritage conservation and environmental leaders.

Heal the Bay Aquarium under the Santa Monica Pier will be free for all visitors in honor of Nick on Saturday, June 3, 2023 thanks to a generous sponsorship. A celebrity guest reader will pop in for story time and special art activities will be offered, as well as screenings of documentaries exploring issues of race, coastal access, and following your passion against all odds (12 Miles North: The Nick Gabald贸n Story鈥 [2012] and “La Maestra (The Teacher)” [2014]).

Tentative Agenda: June 3, 2023

  • 9 am聽Welcome Ceremony and Memorial Paddle Out聽for Nick at Bay Street Beach
  • 10 am – 1 pm Free surf lessons, beach and local history exploration, and cleanup at Bay Street Beach. MUST REGISTER TO ACCESS FREE SURF LESSONS.
  • 1 pm – 4 pm聽Celebration continues at聽Heal the Bay Aquarium聽under the Santa Monica Pier;聽admission to the Aquarium is free聽today in honor of Nick.
    • 1 pm聽Documentary screening
    • 2 pm Children’s story time with guest reader
    • 3 pm聽Documentary screening

Nick Gabald贸n Day 2023 Presented By
Black Surfers Collective
Heal the Bay
Surf Bus Foundation
Santa Monica Conservancy

聽Partners
Swim Up Hill
Color the Water
LA28 Olympic and Paralympic Games
SoFly Surf School

Participating Youth Groups
Outward Bound Adventures
The Boys & Girls Club of Pasadena

Sponsors
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation – Funding for this project was provided (in part) by the Refugio Beach Oil Spill South Coast Shoreline Parks and Outdoor Recreation Grants Program overseen by the Refugio Beach Oil Spill Trustee Council.

For more information about partnership and sponsorship opportunities please contact: Jeff Williams, Black Surfers Collective, ghettosurfn@gmail.com or Meredith McCarthy, Heal the Bay 310.451.1500 ext. 116 or mmccarthy@healthebay.org.

Bios

Alison Rose Jefferson M.H.C. Ph.D.

Alison Rose Jefferson M.H.C. Ph.D. is a historian and heritage conservation consultant who has contributed to the organization of the Nick Gabald贸n Day celebration since 2013. Currently, Jefferson’s work is public facing as consultant on Los Angeles history projects. Her book Living the California Dreams: African American Leisure Sites during the in the Jim Crow Era, rethinks the significance of the struggle for leisure and public space for all within the long freedom rights struggle and civil rights movement. Her book was honored with the 2020 Miriam Matthews Ethnic History Award by the Los Angeles City Historical Society for its exceptional contributions to the greater understanding and awareness of regional history. Dr. Jefferson鈥檚 work has garnered attention in the L.A. Times and other media outlets. For more information about her activities visit her website, www.alisonrosejefferson.com.

Surf Bus Foundation

鈥婽he Surf Bus Foundation’s mission is to empower people to have a healing connection to the sea. They do this by engaging in ocean sports like surfing, swimming and beach games while exploring the wonder and beauty of the sea. Our teaching and mentoring provides understanding that encourages a lifelong commitment to share and protect our oceans for all to enjoy.

Jamal Hill

Jamal Hill is a Los Angeles based educator and community leader with over 10 years of experience in aquatics that include teaching inner-city youth swim lessons, serving as an LA County lifeguard, and representing Team USA as a member of the Paralympic Swimming team. Dismantling the barriers to industry entry such as previous aquatic related trauma, lack of access to calm water environments, unestablished learning curves, and non-affordable pricing, Jamal helps to create restorative justice through swimming for underserved communities with little access to this life saving essentials.



Plastic pollution is a major problem in Los Angeles because plastic makes up the majority of LA County鈥檚 litter, according to a UCLA report commissioned by LA County鈥檚 Sustainability Office.聽 LAist recently reported that about 85% of plastic is NOT recycled, “instead, it fills up landfills or ends up in the street and gets flushed into storm drains and ultimately the ocean, causing harmful and deadly consequences to ocean life” (Restaurants In Unincorporated LA County Are Now Banned From Using Plastics, Erin Stone). Consumers are often unaware that when plastic is recycled, thrown away, or improperly put in recycling bins it often ends up in the same place and is always detrimental to the environment.

For several years, Heal the Bay has been working with LA City and County to help create legislation aiming to break the harmful plastic cycle.聽 And finally, there is some hope.聽聽聽

In 2023, THREE new laws are making big waves for the environment, and ultimately, reducing plastic in our oceans.聽 They may sound confusing, but the result is simple, less plastic! Here is Heal the Bay’s quick breakdown of those laws:

Citywide Changes

Good Riddance to Bad Rubbish

The City of Los Angeles, in accordance with the first phase of the LA Sanitation and Environment (LASAN) Comprehensive Plastics Reduction Program, passed several exciting laws in 2022 to reduce waste and curb plastic pollution in our region. Since then, two of those laws have officially gone into effect as LA takes major steps to reduce single-use plastics.

So Long, Styrofoam

1) The sale of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS), commonly known as Styrofoam, has been banned.

The LA City law went into effect on April 23, 2023, and asserts that no restaurant or retail store can give, sell, distribute, or offer products made of EPS to any consumer. This includes cups, plates, bowls, takeaway containers, egg cartons, and even ice coolers. The first phase will only impact establishments with more than 26 employees and will expand to include all restaurants and retail establishments in April 2024.

Shop Till You Drop the Plastic Bag

2) The City expanded its existing bag ban to include all retail shops.

The LA City 鈥減lastic bag ban鈥 has been in place for nearly a decade, banning local LA grocery stores from handing out single-use plastic bags and charging ten cents ($0.10) for alternative single-use carryout bags.聽 This law was a means to reduce plastic in the environment and encourage the public to invest in reusable totes bags instead. In 2023, the ban on single-use plastic bags was expanded to large retail stores.聽 Now in effect, retail establishments that employ more than 26 employees should no longer offer flimsy single-use plastic bags to consumers and will offer alternatives聽or paper bags聽for a $.10 fee.聽 As of July 2023, all other shops including apparel stores, farmers markets, and food or beverage facilities will join the list of places to ban the bag.

If you suspect your favorite clothing store, watering hole or eatery is unaware of these new rules, let them know!聽 Education is the most important part of creating change in your community. You can also give LA Sanitation a call and let them know, too at 213-485-2260.聽

LA Countywide Changes

This year has brought a big environmental win to even more places beyond the municipality limits, impacting communities all over Los Angeles County.

Sticking a Fork in the Single-Use Plastic Problem

3) LA County Foodware Ordinance:

In April 2022, LA County celebrated Earth Month with the passage of unprecedented legislation to reduce single-use plastics and curb plastic pollution and it is already being rolled out.聽 As of May 1st, you should no longer be offered single-use plastic foodware or Styrofoam products at restaurants in the unincorporated areas聽of LA County! But this ordinance does so much more:聽

  • Phases out single-use foodware that is not compostable or recyclable. Since plastic is neither, that means no more single-use plastic foodware!聽
  • Phases out the sale of products made of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) aka Styrofoam.
  • Requires full-service restaurants to use reusable foodware for customers who are dining on-site (including reusable plates, cups, bowls, silverware).

The ordinance will go into effect in phases but, for now, if you see a restaurant not complying, be sure to let them know or contact LA County Public Works.

A Huge Relief and Cause for Hope
Heal the Bay volunteers have removed more than 4 trillion pieces of trash from LA County Beaches in the past 3 decades, and sadly, 80% was plastic. These ordinances are just the first steps on a long journey to end the local dependency on plastic in Los Angeles. With LA leading the way, the rest of California is following along with the passage of bills like SB54.聽 There is finally real hope for a plastic-free future in LA with safe clean watersheds across the State.

RESOURCES

UNINCORPORATED LA COUNTY MAP

LIST OF UNINCORPORATED AREAS IN LA COUNTY

REUSABLE LA COALITION

DEEP DIVE INTO THE ORDIANCE WITH LAIST;

UCLA REPORT

MORE ON SB54

 



This is a developing story and we will update information as new details come to light.

UPDATE: 6:30 PM Pacific Time On April 19, 2023.

The City of LA/LA Sanitation & Environment has responded to the April 7 deadline from the Regional Water Board and did not accept the fine or waive the hearing. They have instead entered into further negotiations with the Regional Water Board.聽 More to come as we receive information.

UPDATE: 6:30 PM Pacific Time On April 6, 2023.

Late last week, the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board announced a tentative fine of $21.7M to the City of LA for the July 2021 sewage spill at the Hyperion Treatment facility. The fine is based on five categories of violations, including 1) the discharge of 12.5 million gallons of raw sewage to the Santa Monica Bay, 2) failure to perform offshore sampling for 14 days, 3) failure to comply with permit requirements for odors for 80 days, 4) failure to comply with monitoring and permit reporting requirements for 108 days, and 5) violations of water quality limits for 217 days (38 serious and 22 non-serious violations). The City of LA has until tomorrow, April 7, to agree to this fine and waive a hearing on the matter or to request a postponement of the hearing to allow for further deliberations. Even if the City agrees, there will be a 30-day window for public comment. If the City does not agree to the settlement or ask for a postponement, there will be a hearing. While the maximum amount for the fine, based on the violations, could have been over $500B (yes, that鈥檚 billion!), $21.7M is actually the largest penalty the LA Regional Water Board has ever proposed for permit violations. We don鈥檛 yet know how or where the final fine amount will be allocated but we hope that a majority of it will go to Supplemental Environmental Projects (SEPs), which provide environmental and public health benefits to affected areas and communities. The good news is that LA Sanitation & Environment (LASAN) has taken numerous steps to ensure this doesn鈥檛 happen again by implementing recommendations from an Ad Hoc Advisory Committee of water quality experts from across the country, as detailed in their report鈥痶hat was released in February 2022. Namely, LASAN has installed additional alarms (audio and visual), completed a comprehensive update of protocols for emergency response and notifications, implemented an interagency task force for emergency response actions with LA County, El Segundo and City of LA departments, established a hotline call-in number operated 24/7, conducted equipment tests and procedure practices, installed new equipment, and upgraded existing equipment. Additional improvements that are in-progress or planned include equipment upgrades, development of plans to protect major equipment from flood damage, and more. Heal the Bay will continue to advocate to ensure that the City of LA provides sufficient funding to LASAN for critical upgrades and ongoing operations and maintenance. We will continue to track this issue and provide updates as we get them as well as opportunities for the public to weigh in.聽

UPDATE: 3:00 PM Pacific Time on April 13, 2022.

According to a new Daily Breeze article, “42 million gallons of sewage entered LA waterways in past 15 years. More than half of the total was spilled in 2021 alone. A nearly catastrophic disaster at the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant and the sudden collapse of a sewer system in Carson last year combined to make it the worst since the beginning of the data set in April 2007. The two spills, roughly six months and 15 miles apart, led to the total release of 25 million gallons of raw sewage either directly into the ocean or into waterways that empty into it.”

It鈥檚 been nearly 8 months since the massive sewage spill from the Hyperion Treatment Plant and two key updates occurred recently.

First, we recently learned that Hyperion Treatment Plant has not been complying with air quality standards since the spill. This is alarming news considering that the plant emits greenhouse gasses hundreds of times more potent than carbon dioxide. While Hyperion is no longer discharging under-treated sewage into the ocean, the environmental impact of the sewage spill continues. We urge regulators to take prompt action and ensure Hyperion鈥檚 air emissions are in compliance.

Second, The City of Los Angeles, Board of Public Works assembled an advisory committee composed of government officials, academics, and NGO representatives. Our very own CEO, Shelley Luce, was on the committee. The committee was tasked with conducting an independent assessment of the spill, and their findings were recently released in February in a report along with recommendations for minimizing sewage spill risk in the future.

The report found that a series of missteps led to the sewage spill rather than a single sudden influx of debris that inundated Hyperion鈥檚 machinery, which was the original theory. Here is the series of events as we understand them:

  1. The machines (bar screens) that Hyperion uses to remove trash and large items from our waste water became clogged because some of that trash was allowed to cycle back through those machines due to a design failure. It is also important to note that trash should not be flushed down the toilet.聽
  2. When the trash removal machines became clogged, alarms were triggered, but they were not responded to in time and Hyperion鈥檚 headworks facility (building where trash is removed from our wastewater) began to flood.
  3. Once the flooding began, it was too dangerous for workers to open an underground bypass channel that could have relieved the flooding. Opening this channel required workers to lift a large metal barrier out of the ground using a ceiling-mounted crane.
  4. The sewage flowed to other parts of Hyperion, damaging critical equipment and systems, which further hampered their ability to respond to the situation.
  5. Hyperion鈥檚 storm drain system, which feeds into the 1-mile ocean outfall, was eventually filled with sewage, resulting in 13 million gallons of sewage spilling into Santa Monica Bay.

The report recommended the following improvements and next steps:

  • Upgrade the trash removal equipment to reduce or eliminate the chance that trash is sent back through the machinery once it has already been removed from the wastewater.
  • Improve the alarm functionality by designing an alarm that will be immediately noticed.
  • Conduct additional staff training and revise protocols for alarm and flooding response.聽
  • Conduct additional recruitment to fill jobs in the headworks facility, which is where the flooding began.聽

We appreciate the creation of this report and we support its recommendations for improvements to Hyperion鈥檚 systems and processes. Heal the Bay鈥檚 additional recommendations for next steps in light of the report are:

  1. Integrate the advisory committee report recommendations with the 30-day report (initial report released 30 days after the spill) recommendations. We need the findings from both reports combined so that all the information and data for the spill is in one place. Information on impacts to the public (e.g. beach closures, odors, public health impacts, economic impacts) as well as water and air quality violations should be included. And, this will help create one cohesive plan for improving Hyperion.
  2. Prioritize the recommendations from both reports based on their significance and/or ease of correction. And each recommended action should be accompanied by a realistic timeline in which it can be addressed.
  3. Provide stakeholders and the public with regular progress updates as improvements are made to the plant. At the very least, the Hyperion Recovery website should remain active and should be updated with such progress reports.

Heal the Bay is committed to working with LA City Public Works and Sanitation (as well as other agencies and groups) to make sure that the report recommendations are addressed promptly to protect the health and safety of Hyperion鈥檚 workers as well as the general public and the environment. Implementation of the recommendations along with the rebuilding of public trust will be paramount as Hyperion transitions to full wastewater recycling by 2035. This transition means that Hyperion will no longer discharge treated water to the ocean, but will instead recycle 100% of its water to provide for a reliable and local source of water in the face of ongoing drought and climate change impacts. Heal the Bay is a strong supporter of this effort to reduce our reliance on imported water as well as reduce impacts to the ocean 鈥 we will be tracking the issue closely to ensure that public health is prioritized along with sustainability.

UPDATE: 10:30 am Pacific Time on November 2, 2021.

We have some promising news regarding the Hyperion Treatment Plant. For the past few months, the plant has been operating in a diminished capacity due to the damage it sustained on July 11 that resulted in the discharge of 17 million gallons of raw sewage nearshore (1 mile out). Consequently, LA Sanitation (LASAN) was discharging wastewater from Hyperion Treatment Plant into the ocean (5 miles out) that did not meet regulatory requirements. We now have confirmation that the plant is fully operational according to the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board (LARWQCB).

After the July 11 disaster, LASAN was issued a notice of violation by the LARWQCB for the discharge of raw sewage in violation of their permit, which will likely result in fines. Further, LASAN was required to conduct additional water quality monitoring by the LARWQCB, initially consisting of daily samples taken at multiple locations and depths, 5 miles offshore. In mid-September the LARWQCB approved a request by LASAN to reduce monitoring to three times per week and, just this week, approved LASAN鈥檚 request to cease all additional offshore monitoring. The LARWQB made this decision based on the water quality data and the reports that LASAN has been required to submit. We have also reviewed the data provided on Hyperion鈥檚 recovery webpage and found that contaminant levels in the wastewater discharged into the ocean do indeed meet regulatory requirements. However, we do have a few lingering concerns about individual events of water quality exceedances over the last month, as well as remaining maintenance work to be done.

We are relieved that Hyperion now appears able to properly treat wastewater before it is discharged into the ocean. However, we still do not know the cause of the flooding and subsequent sewage spill. Heal the Bay is part of an ad hoc group meeting to discuss the causes of the incident and the response by government agencies, and to make recommendations for improvement. The group meets nearly every week with the aim of producing a comprehensive report by the end of the year. Heal the Bay will continue to push for answers from LASAN because we must make sure events like this do not happen in the future. We also look forward to carefully reviewing the report that LASAN must submit to the LARWQB by November 8 as well as tracking and ensuring that there is enforcement of the violations.

UPDATE: 7:00 pm Pacific Time on October 4, 2021.

LA Sanitation recently released a report with an in-depth description of the events that led to the sewage discharge into the Santa Monica Bay on July 11 & 12. Here is a summary of what we learned.

The discharge occurred because the Hyperion Plant鈥檚 barscreens (trash filtration devices) clogged leading to a catastrophic flood event at the facility. Raw sewage flooded large swathes of the facility and damaged machinery and infrastructure necessary for the plant to function. Millions of gallons of this sewage were released through the 1-mile outfall and into Santa Monica Bay as an emergency measure to prevent further flooding and the plant going offline completely.聽

So far, no one has been able to determine the origin of the large amount of debris that clogged the barscreens that day. The flooding also made it impossible for Hyperion to determine the amount of debris that caused the blockages. These are two critical pieces of information for the incident investigation, and we are keeping up the pressure for some answers soon. Fortunately, the minute-by-minute account of July 11 & 12 in Hyperion鈥檚 report gives us some clues as to what went wrong that day and how events like this can be prevented in the future:

  1. Hyperion鈥檚 barscreens have an automated system that clears blockages when they are detected. According to the report, this feature has never been used by the plant due to 鈥渦nreliable level sensors.鈥 The barscreens are instead operated manually, and workers clear any blockages that occur. Hyperion stated in the report that this process needs to be assessed and improved.
  2. There is a barscreen bypass system in place at the plant which could have prevented the flooding. Unfortunately, workers at Hyperion were not able to use the bypass system in time 鈥 the flooding became too dangerous and they had to evacuate. In the report, Hyperion promised to review standard operating procedures and conduct emergency training for the bypass system.
  3. Hyperion will develop flood risk mitigation strategies for certain facilities and equipment at the plant. This will ensure the plant can operate if a flood event happens in the future. Given the plant鈥檚 proximity to the ocean, Hyperion鈥檚 operators need to consider tsunami mitigation in their assessment.聽
  4. While the origin of the barscreen-clogging debris is still a mystery, it is an opportune moment for Hyperion and water advocates to remind the public what can and cannot be flushed down the toilet (only flush bodily waste and toilet paper, nothing else). Hyperion stated that they will increase public education efforts, which Heal the Bay would be willing to assist with as we鈥檝e done in the past.

We appreciate the transparency and data that Hyperion has provided in their report and on their website. Nevertheless, there are still some big questions that need to be answered in addition to the origin of the barscreen debris. Hyperion has not made an official announcement that they are fully operational, and we would appreciate a timeline of when they expect that to happen. The Hyperion Recovery website is still listing some critical process equipment as currently being serviced, and there are reports that the treatment plant is almost fully operational. We are also seeking more information on the quality of the wastewater currently being discharged out the 5-mile outfall.

What was causing the foul odors near Hyperion? We are getting this question a lot, so we wanted to provide some more detail. Flooding at the plant damaged the pumps that move sewage from open-air holding tanks to the secondary processing infrastructure. For three weeks, excessive amounts of sewage built up in the holding tanks while workers repaired the pumps. The odors that have plagued South Bay communities came from these holding tanks. Hyperion stated that they have been processing this backlog of sewage, and air quality will continue to improve. We鈥檝e also learned that Hyperion has ended the air filtration & AC unit reimbursement program for households impacted by the odors.

 

UPDATE: 10:20 am Pacific Time on September 23, 2021.

Here is what has been going on behind-the-scenes at Heal the Bay as a follow up to the massive sewage spill from the Hyperion plant back in July 2021.

We took a tour of the Hyperion plant to see the extent of damages from the incident, which is still under investigation. We learned about what’s happening to recover Hyperion as efficiently and safely as possible, and we met some of the hardworking people who have the enormous responsibility to treat LA鈥檚 wastewater day in and day out.聽We are working closely with LA Public Works to evaluate existing systems for repairs and upgrades at the plant where needed.

Recent data from the Hyperion 2021 Recovery website shows the effluent coming out of the 5-mile pipe from Hyperion is getting back to within regulatory limits for most water quality measurements. However, bacteria levels at the 5-mile outfall are consistently exceeding health limits, which is alarming. The public has not been provided with a timeline for when water quality improvements are expected. Fortunately, bacteria does not appear to be impacting our beaches 鈥 as indicated by beach water quality monitoring. According to the Clean Water Act, Hyperion should be fined for every day it is out of compliance with public health and safety standards. So far it has been 74 days since the spill first occurred.


An engineer points to how high the flooding water was during the catastrophic incident at the Hyperion plant on July 11-12.

When the spill occurred on July 11-12, there was catastrophic flooding within the Hyperion plant. Raw sewage permanently disabled plant electronics that control pumps and other functions at the plant, and equipment had to be replaced. For many weeks the plant could not complete the secondary phase of the treatment process, and the only option was to pump under-treated wastewater into the ocean. The replacement and repairs are mainly done and water quality is mostly back to normal. The elevated bacteria levels at the 5-mile outfall are still an issue and we are pushing the City to determine the cause and fix it as soon as possible.

The City of Los Angeles Sanitation and Environment Department (LASAN) submitted their 30-day action report to the Regional Board and US EPA, and we are reviewing it. We’ll provide an in-depth update about it soon. Recently at the request of LASAN, the Regional Water Board reduced the required sampling from daily to three times per week.

Our team continues to closely monitor water quality with the Beach Report Card and LA County鈥檚 Beach Water Quality Advisories website. The good news is, aside from the usual bummers, we鈥檙e seeing good grades at most of LA鈥檚 beaches for the past month. A couple sites with chronic water quality issues are the Santa Monica Pier and Mother鈥檚 Beach in Marina del Rey 鈥 coming into contact with the water at these beach areas should generally be avoided, especially by young children, senior citizens, and people who are immunocompromised. Install our free Beach Report Card iOS or Android app so you can have the latest water quality grades in your pocket.

UPDATE: 7:30 pm Pacific Time on August 20, 2021.

 

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The latest beach grades for LA are in鈥 most beaches have great water quality scores!

But, Santa Monica Beach at the Santa Monica Pier came in with an “F” grade. Avoid swimming here until water quality tests show it’s safe.

Get all the grades at our Beach Report Card.

 

UPDATE: 12:10 pm Pacific Time on August 17, 2021.


Dr. Shelley Luce, Heal the Bay CEO, is joining a virtual townhall hosted by The Board of Public Works to discuss water quality and health impacts from the Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant sewage spill in the Santa Monica Bay.

The virtual townhall is on Wednesday, August 18 at 5:30 p.m. Join online or by phone.

 

UPDATE: 8:45 pm Pacific Time on August 10, 2021.

Our communities continue to have concerns and questions regarding the impacts of sewage in the ocean. Here we answer the top 5 questions we’ve been hearing on social media.

Where does the sewage magically go, which makes it safe for swimming?

Once the sewage is discharged, it travels where the ocean currents take it 鈥 that could be further out to sea, closer to shore, or it may remain in place.

Over time, fecal matter and urine will be consumed by microorganisms. This is not desirable because sewage discharges are not natural and may alter the food chain. The microorganisms consuming sewage may also consume chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and toxins contained within the fecal matter and urine. These chemical compounds might then get transferred up the food chain as other organisms consume the sewage-eating ones. Particulates like plastic and toilet paper may get ingested by larger organisms in the water or the material might settle into the sediment.

When it is deemed “safe to swim” does that mean the amount of toxins could still be above what’s normally acceptable?

Human fecal matter contains many microorganisms that can get humans sick from a single exposure. That is why our beaches are tested regularly for the presence of fecal matter, and it’s why California has strict fecal-indicator bacteria standards. Recreational water quality standards do not take into account other forms of pollution like toxins and chemicals because, in general, it takes many exposures over a long period of time to become sick from toxins and chemicals. Heal the Bay continues to advocate for increased water quality monitoring, especially for 鈥渇orever chemicals鈥 like PCBs and DDT.

How could this impact dolphins and other animals in the Bay?

We are concerned about all organisms in the Bay, including dolphins, fish, algae, and invertebrates living in the sediment. All organisms have a niche and play a role in maintaining a healthy ocean ecosystem. The sewage discharges will likely change the abundance and distribution of smaller organisms first as they consume the sewage. Those changes to the bottom of the food chain may then impact species that are higher up on the chain like fish and dolphins. The other concern is that chemicals and pharmaceuticals contained in the sewage will also get transferred up the food chain as the sewage-eating microorganisms are consumed by larger organisms.

How often is water quality being tested? Who is conducting these water safety tests?

Right now, the beaches between Ballona Creek and Manhattan Beach are being tested every day. Under normal circumstances, all beaches in the Santa Monica Bay typically get monitored 2-3 times a week in the summer on average. Santa Monica Bay beaches are monitored for recreational water quality by four government agencies: LASAN, LA County Department of Public Health, Sanitation Districts of LA County, and the City of Redondo Beach.

How can we prevent this in the future?

鈥婽here is an ongoing investigation into the cause of the damage to the Hyperion Treatment Plant in El Segundo, which triggered millions of gallons of raw and partially treated sewage to be released into the Bay. Once we know the cause(s) we can advocate for preventative measures. However, we don鈥檛 need an investigation to tell us what is obvious: the public was not sufficiently notified about the sewage discharge into the Santa Monica Bay. Heal the Bay is working to put pressure on LASAN and LA County Department of Public Health to investigate why public notifications were not forthcoming and how they can ensure more expedient public warnings.

UPDATE: 8:45 pm Pacific Time on August 9, 2021.

 

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Make your voice heard about the recent 17 million gallon raw sewage spill and the ongoing discharges of partially treated sewage into the Bay from Hyperion.

Tell the City of LA your concerns and that you demand they take immediate action to improve the emergency public notification protocols and implement preventative measures so this never happens again.

Act now: The City Council meeting starts at 10am on Tuesday, August 10.

Send in a comment to the Los Angeles City Council hearing tomorrow – use Council File # 21-0839:
https://cityclerk.lacity.org/publiccomment/
-or-
Call 1 669 254 5252 and use Meeting ID No. 160 535 8466 and then press #. Press # again when prompted for participant ID. Once admitted into the meeting, press *9 to request to speak.

Watch and listen to the council meeting here:
Cable TV Channel 35
https://clerk.lacity.org/calendar
(213) 621-CITY (METRO)
(818) 904-9450 (VALLEY)
(310) 471-CITY (WESTSIDE)
(310) 547-CITY (SAN PEDRO AREA)

UPDATE: 10:25 am Pacific Time on August 4, 2021.

The City of Los Angeles Sanitation & Environment (LASAN) launched a new webpage that addresses sewage discharge at the Hyperion Plant in El Segundo. It briefly covers the cause of the catastrophic incident and the recovery effort underway.聽

We want you to be aware of the data table (with multiple tabs) at the bottom of the page. It shows the pollutant levels in the effluent (via sampling results of what Hyperion is discharging from the 5-mile outfall), equipment status, odor monitoring results, offshore monitoring results for bacteria, and links to other data, which don鈥檛 appear to be working or filled in yet. 鈥淓ffluent鈥 is the treated wastewater that Hyperion releases to the ocean. In other words, influent is what comes into the plant (raw sewage and other debris), and effluent is what goes out of the plant (typically treated wastewater that has to meet certain standards).

VIEW LASAN’S HYPERION 2021 RECOVERY PAGE

We will be reviewing the data closely and providing a deeper analysis for you. But, our first impressions are that exceedances (aka violations) are occurring for multiple parameters in the effluent since July 11-12, indicating that LASAN is violating their permit by continuing to discharge inadequately treated sewage into the Bay, and is still not able to fully treat sewage. What is even more concerning is that the levels of certain pollutants appear to be increasing over the last couple of weeks (the weekly average numbers are getting larger). These high levels of total suspended solids (TSS), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), settleable solids, turbidity, and oil & grease may have long-term negative impacts on marine life and ecosystems.聽

Our team will provide more information about the pollutants and what the potential impacts could be for the Santa Monica Bay later this week.

Despite this alarming data, recent beach water quality tests have indicated the water in the Santa Monica Bay is safe for human recreation. All beach advisories, except for Avalon Beach on Catalina Island, have been lifted because water samples have not exceeded State water quality standards. This is good news for beachgoers, but we recommend that you always check the latest beach conditions at the LA County Department of Public Health’s website and Heal the Bay’s Beach Report Card.

 

UPDATE: 8:00 am Pacific Time on August 3, 2021.

LA County Department of Public Health (DPH) released an update last night that ocean water samples collected at聽the following locations have met State water quality standards and beach advisories have been lifted:

  • Dockweiler State Beach
    • Ballona Creek (Near Dockweiler Tower 40)
    • Culver Blvd storm drain
    • Imperial Highway storm drain
    • Westchester storm drain
  • Pico-Kenter storm drain (Santa Monica Beach)
  • Topanga Canyon Lagoon (Topanga Canyon Beach in Malibu)

A warning is still in place for Avalon Beach at Catalina Island (50 feet east of the pier). The Department of Public Health continues cautioning all to be careful of swimming, surfing, and playing in this area.

Thanks for staying updated.

 

UPDATE: 11:46 am Pacific Time on July 30, 2021.

 

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We are shocked that LA Sanitation & Environment (LASAN) has continued to release inadequately treated sewage into the Bay. It’s been over two weeks since the 17 million gallon sewage spill, and we are now learning that the Hyperion plant is not able to fully treat sewage.

The discharge contains bacteria and viruses as well as organic matter that causes low oxygen levels in ocean waters 鈥 the impacts on human health and marine life can be significant and very damaging. LASAN should have notified the public and stakeholders who have been tracking the spill results closely for the last two weeks. We don’t know if LASAN has increased monitoring to assess the impacts of the partially treated discharge 鈥 that needed to start immediately 鈥 and going forward we need transparency in order to ensure appropriate actions are taking place to assess impacts, protect people and wildlife, and pursue fines and mitigation measures to the maximum extent.

Heal the Bay was founded in the 1980s by local activists who refused to accept partially treated sewage being dumped into the Bay by Hyperion. It鈥檚 now 30 plus years later 鈥 great progress has been made, but without watchdogs we’re at risk of repeating past mistakes.

The LA Regional Water Quality Control Board has taken immediate action to boost monitoring in the Santa Monica Bay.

Last night we received a notice from the LA Regional Water Quality Control Board (Regional Board) issuing an order to the City of Los Angeles LA Sanitation and Environment (LASAN) Hyperion Treatment Plant to provide monitoring and reporting related to the discharge of sewage on July 11 and 12.

The order details how the flooding at the plant led to non-operational equipment resulting in reduced efficiency of treatment and a reduction in the quality of the discharge from the 5 mile outfall. The order documents that since the initial incident, Hyperion has violated its discharge permit by releasing effluent that is in exceedance of limits for parameters including total suspended solids (TSS), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), turbidity, and settleable solids.

These exceedances will result in fines 鈥 however, they could have negative impacts on human health and the marine environment. We are glad to see that the Regional Board is requiring daily offshore monitoring and submission of daily monitoring and status reports. The offshore monitoring appears to include four stations, each to be tested at three depths (<1m, 15 meters, and at the outfall depth). Testing at these locations must be done for 12 parameters, including bacteria levels, which are indicative of impacts to human health.

The latest advisory from the LA County Department of Public Health (DPH) states that they are continuing to test shoreline bacteria levels daily. Heal the Bay scientists and experts will be reviewing the locations and frequency of testing today by DPH and LASAN to ensure that the frequency and spatial coverage is protective of public health. And we will continue to ask for rapid methods to be used for detection of bacterial pollution 鈥 the methods being used now take 18-24 hours to obtain results and then additional time for that information to get to the public. Rapid methods would allow for more real-time results to be available to the public.

The LA County Board of Supervisors and LA City Council members have initiated a full investigation into the 17 million gallon spill and continued discharges from Hyperion.

In addition to the Water Board鈥檚 actions outlined above, the LA County Board of Supervisors has requested a full investigation within 30 days (scroll down to our last update on 7/29 for more info). And the LA City Council is demanding a detailed report and action plan too, which includes instructing LASAN to 鈥渓ook for engineering opportunities during repairs to begin transforming the facility to recycle 100% of wastewater as part of the city鈥檚 Operation NEXT,鈥 according to the Daily Breeze.

Is it safe to swim in the Bay today?

If you are deciding whether or not you should go into the water at LA鈥檚 beaches this weekend, we want to be clear: there are potential health risks at some locations.

Water quality tests from sites across the Bay have indicated high bacteria levels around El Segundo, Dockweiler, and Venice beach areas. These beach areas are under an advisory and should be avoided until tests indicate the water quality is good.

If you are heading to other areas in the Bay, we recommend that you check the latest beach conditions at the LA County Department of Public Health’s website and Heal the Bay’s Beach Report Card (so you can avoid beach areas impacted by bacterial-pollution issues). Conditions can change rapidly, so pay attention to beach postings and remember there is a 24-hour lag between water testing and posted warnings.

Message us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook or contact us online if you need any help getting started with our Beach Report Card website or app 鈥 or if you have any questions or concerns, don’t hesitate to reach out and we’ll do our best to get you an answer.

UPDATE: 11:00 am Pacific Time on July 29, 2021.

One week after the massive raw sewage spill in the Santa Monica Bay from the Hyperion Plant in El Segundo, the LA County Board of Supervisors met and heard an update on what went wrong, particularly related to notification protocols, and what next steps are needed. Heal the Bay staff called in to the hearing to speak on the item, but we were not able to because they cut off public comment after 1 hour for all items on the agenda. We were glad to hear at least three people speak passionately on the issue. We did send in a letter, supporting the motion as well as offering additional recommendations. You can read our letter and other public correspondence on the item here:聽http://file.lacounty.gov/SDSInter/bos/supdocs/160317.pdf

The agenda item was heard around 3:15pm and included a brief presentation on the聽expedited report from CityGate that Supervisor Hahn requested right after the massive release of raw sewage. The findings of the report are quite disturbing and highlight multiple failures in communication and notification, primarily by the LA County Department of Public Health (DPH).

Next, Supervisor Hahn asked a series of questions of Dr. Barbara Ferrer (Director, LA County Dept Public Health), Gary Jones (Director, LA County Dept of Beaches & Harbors), and Fernando Boiteux, (Chief, LA County Lifeguard Division). Dr. Ferrer started by apologizing to the Board and the public; she took full responsibility for the failures and stated that DPH has already made fixes and will continue to improve training, processes, and protocols. Dr. Ferrer said that what happened was unacceptable and that it will never happen again. We appreciated hearing this apology and DPH taking responsibility for their actions (or lack of actions) and the commitment to do better.

Supervisor Hahn asked Dr. Ferrer about ensuring that public health 鈥 both in the water and in the community – continue to be protected as the Hyperion plant recovers from the major failure and undergoes construction to get back fully online. El Segundo neighborhoods are bearing the brunt of聽unbearable odors聽and聽LASAN is offering vouchers for air conditioners and hotel rooms聽for those affected. Dr. Ferrer assured Supervisor Hahn that water quality would continue to be tested and that the DPH team would be conducting door-to-door outreach in the community to ensure that affected residents know how to contact them, report odors, and get access to resources.

Gary Jones from Beaches & Harbors and Fernando Boiteux from County Lifeguards also answered questions about when they received notice of the sewage discharge, what could be improved in communications, and how beach closures should ideally proceed.

The motion was passed, which will result in a more in-depth After Action Report to be produced in 30 days. This follow-up report will detail what happened, where the failures occurred, and recommendations for fixing failures and ensuring this never happens again.

Heal the Bay greatly appreciated the updates and the transparency and accountability that the report and hearing provided. We will be actively following this issue and are engaging with Supervisor Hahn鈥檚 office and agencies to offer our recommendations and participate in the process. We will continue to hold agencies accountable and ensure that there are appropriate repercussions for the multiple failures that occurred.

 

UPDATE: 6:00 pm Pacific Time on July 23, 2021.

 

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A report was released this week, and made public today, about the recent 17-million gallon sewage spill from the Hyperion plant in El Segundo. 鈥淭he handling of this release and the necessary public notification were failures, the initial report concluded.

The LA County Board of Supervisors will be hearing this expedited report on Tuesday, July 27 starting at 9:30 am.聽The Board will be voting on a motion to get this update as well as to request a more detailed 鈥淎fter Action鈥 report within 30 days. Heal the Bay will be supporting this motion by sending in a letter and calling in to give oral testimony at the hearing. We will be suggesting additional recommendations, such as implementing rapid testing methods for water quality and tracking the plume through satellite imagery and other methods.

Take action!

Watch the hearing, send in an email or a letter, and try to call in to the hearing to speak (this can be challenging to do as speaking time is limited).

TUNE IN ON JULY 27:
Agenda and info on how to watch and give comment (on the first page): https://bos.lacounty.gov/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=AezaZ2KttC4%3d&portalid=1聽(agenda item #36)

MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD IN ADVANCE:
To send an email or a letter in advance of the hearing (select item 36): https://publiccomment.bos.lacounty.gov/

We appreciate Supervisor Hahn鈥檚 leadership on this and hope to work collaboratively with County and City agencies to ensure this never happens again. And, if it does, that the public is notified immediately and effectively.

UPDATE: 9:10 pm Pacific Time on July 14, 2021.

This evening the LA County Department of Public Health lifted beach closures at Dockweiler State Beach and El Segundo Beach because water samples taken over the past two days have not shown dangerous levels of fecal-indicator bacteria. Based on these results, it appears safe at most locations in the Santa Monica Bay, but we urge you to exercise caution by regularly checking the LA County Department of Public Health website for water conditions and beach closures at聽PublicHealth.LACounty.gov/Beach聽and Heal the Bay鈥檚聽Beach Report Card.

There are four sites in the Santa Monica Bay that currently do exceed State standards and coming into contact with water at these locations could cause illness – it is unclear if these exceedances are due to the sewage spill, recent rainfall, or something else:

  • Topanga County Beach at the Topanga Canyon Lagoon
  • Will Rogers State Beach at the Santa Monica Canyon storm drain
  • Santa Monica State Beach at the Santa Monica Pier
  • Manhattan County Beach at the 28th Street storm drain

Heal the Bay聽won鈥檛 let up on pushing for聽improvements that prevent sewage spills, advance water quality testing methods, and ensure public notifications happen swiftly and equitably.聽Thanks to everyone in the community for reaching out, voicing concerns, asking questions, staying informed, and most importantly protecting each other by sharing critical updates. This community is strong. It is amazing to see us spring into action. Thank you.

More to come on next steps, so you can take action to hold polluters accountable and to prevent this from happening again.

 

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UPDATE: 7:15 pm Pacific Time on July 13, 2021.

We have some preliminary good news to share 鈥 but don鈥檛 rush back to the water quite yet.

Water samples taken on Monday, July 12 by LA City Bureau of Sanitation & the Environment (LASAN) and LA County Department of Public Health (DPH) do not聽show high levels of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB). FIB, in significant quantities, indicate the presence of harmful pathogens in the water. Samples were taken at numerous locations at the shoreline and offshore, at various depths.

While this is good news, the beaches are still closed and will remain closed until two consecutive days of sampling show safe water quality. So, samples were taken again today and if they show low levels of bacteria, closures will be lifted tomorrow.

These results are very preliminary since the samples were taken Monday morning and early afternoon. Tides, currents and wind continue to move water around and we don’t know where the contamination may have ended up.

We also don鈥檛 know what the water quality was before the samples were collected 鈥 i.e. on Sunday evening and early Monday morning. It is possible that bacteria levels were higher then, and that people who got in the water were unknowingly exposed to poor water quality.

We appreciate that LASAN and DPH have been forthcoming with us on the results,聽but we feel strongly that this information should be spread widely to the general public, as early as possible. LA County DPH is responsible for notifying the public of dangerous levels of contamination. Given the significant amount of raw sewage released, nearby beaches should have been closed immediately. Delaying public notification by 12-24 hours is not acceptable.

We have heard from many concerned folx that they were at the beaches on Sunday evening and Monday all day without any knowledge of the spill, or any ability to take precautions. We will be working with City and County agencies to establish protocols that better protect public health. We also urge LASAN and DPH to use rapid methods to detect contamination more quickly. DNA-based lab methods like PCR are readily available and provide reliable results in minutes or hours, rather than the 24-hour process required for traditional bacterial monitoring. Using methods like these, in addition to traditional methods, as long as they are accompanied with good public notification, would help get critical information to our many ocean users much more quickly and could prevent significant harm to LA residents and visitors.

You can check the status of beach closures and conditions on LA County’s recorded information hotline, available 24 hours a day, at 1-800-525-5662. Information about beach closures and conditions is also available online at: PublicHealth.LACounty.gov/Beach.聽

We will continue to track this issue and keep you informed.

 

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UPDATE: 3:20 pm Pacific Time on July 12, 2021.

When did the spill occur?
The sewage spill started at 7 pm on 7/11/2021 and stopped at about 5 am on 7/12/2021. We are told by City of LA’s Bureau of Sanitation that the spill was stopped early this morning at around 5 am and all sewage is now being treated normally.

How much was spilled?
We understand 17 million gallons of raw sewage were spilled through the 1-mile outfall, which is directly offshore from the聽Hyperion Water Reclamation Plant in El Segundo.

Which beaches are impacted?
Currently Dockweiler State Beach and El Segundo Beach are closed to the public.聽The City of Los Angeles and LA County Department of Public Health are聽testing beaches and water in the Santa Monica Bay. More information can be found at the LA County Department of Public Health’s website.

What should the public do to protect themselves?
We recommend the public stay out of the water in the Santa Monica Bay until further notice. Also, check the Beach Report Card for the latest ocean water quality alerts in California, and review the River Report Card for water quality information about freshwater swimming holes in Los Angeles County.

What issues does this cause to people and to ocean wildlife?
Bacteria and viruses in raw sewage are extremely dangerous to people and can carry a variety of diseases. Debris such as tampons and plastic trash, when released into the Bay, can harbor bacteria and can cause entanglement of wildlife, but it seems in this case those debris were successfully filtered out of the spill before it made it to the Bay.

Why did this happen?
We understand the inflow to the Hyperion plant in El Segundo was severely clogged and flooded the facility. The sewage left the facility untreated through the 1-mile pipe and outfall.

What is the source and how can we hold them accountable for pollution?
This is fully the responsibility of the City of LA and their Bureau of Sanitation. The City normally does a very good job of containing and fully treating hundreds of millions of gallons of sewage every day 鈥 but when spills happen the City must move quickly to warn the public, and must discover and fix the cause to prevent future spills.

How can sewage spills be prevented?
Proper maintenance as well as people not flushing trash items such as plastic trash into the system are the best preventative measures.

How often do sewage spills occur?
The last major sewage spill in Los Angeles County was in 2015. However, smaller sewage spills are not an uncommon occurrence. In 2020 to 2021, seventy-five sewage spills sent a total of 346,888 gallons into rivers, lakes, and streams within Los Angeles County. One 222,542 gallon spill in February 2021 closed all the beaches in Long Beach; this area is monitored by Heal the Bay’s Beach Report Card. A total of 39,621 gallons of sewage were spilled into the Los Angeles River, and 140 gallons were spilled into Las Virgenes Creek; both waterways are monitored by Heal the Bay’s River Report Card.

For more information about sewage spills, visit LA County Department of Public Health’s website.

 

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Watch our IG Live below where we answer your questions with our CEO Shelley Luce and Communications Director Talia Walsh.

 

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Earth Month is here!聽 Heal the Bay is excited to celebrate this April from #Summit2Sea.聽 Our waterways are precious and care for them is an essential part of keeping the Earth healthy.聽 This April, make time to honor and care for them, from the San Fernando Valley to Mulholland all the way to the sands of Santa Monica Bay.聽 Greater Los Angeles offers opportunities to learn ways to conserve, go outside to do some good, and celebrate our precious blue planet with Heal the Bay all month long.

Individuals, households, schools, businesses, and community organizations are all invited to attend Heal the Bay鈥檚 Earth Month events. Our inspiring and fun activities all contribute to our dedication to protect Southern California coastal waters, rivers, creeks, and beloved beaches from Summit to Sea.聽 聽Join us and bring your family and friends to help Heal the Bay.


Heal the Bay Earth Month 2023 Calendar of Special Events

Scroll down for our full #Summit2Sea list of Earth Month events and activities waiting for you to get involved.聽 Don’t forget to stop by our partner events listed below, as well.

Beach Captain’s Training- Virtual & In Person

Tuesday, April 11, 6 PM – 7 PM PST

Our monthly Nothin’ But Sand cleanups are public events open for all to join and we couldn’t run these awesome cleanups without the help of our amazing captains & Speakers! Our Beach Captains lead our cleanup volunteers, educate the public on Heal the Bay’s work and mission, help with registration, hand out supplies, fill out community service forms, and represent the organization on the sand. Beach Captain Volunteer Training is a two-step process. First, attend a virtual Beach Captains Volunteer Training, then attend our in-person cleanup to finalize your traininig.

Training Dates:

Hundreds of pounds of trash are removed from the beaches of Los Angeles at each Nothin’ But Sand Cleanup, helping to promote safe, clean coastlines for wildlife and people alike. We could not achieve this without amazing volunteer Beach Captains. Ready to dive in?

聽Register for Beach Captain Training


Nothin’ But Sand Beach Cleanup – In-Person

Saturday, April 15, 10 AM – 1 PM PST

April is Earth Month, so we are amping up our regularly scheduled Nothin’ But Sand cleanup. Come for the great feeling you get when you volunteer, then stay to win prizes at our sponsored raffle.聽 聽While you’re there, check out our on-the-sand art installation Marina the Mermaid聽(Artist Andrea Martina Isenschmid), and celebrate your good work with a silent disco party.聽

Dance your way to a cleaner beach to support Heal the Bay!聽 We are thrilled to partner with聽World of Sound Productions by offering our cleanup volunteers a unique silent disco dance party experience. DJs will be spinning family-friendly music through your rented headphones for ALL AGES including: EDM, house music, nu-disco, hip hop, Latin, pop and remixes from the 70鈥檚 to current day. Headphones will be available for rent on the sand, but you can prebook yours today after you register to reserve your bucket. A percentage of profits will be donated to Heal the Bay to further support our marine and coastal watershed protection work! Reserve your headphones with World of Sound.

A Big Wave of thanks to Golden Road Brewing, Ocean Conservancy, and Los Angeles County Beaches and Harbors for sponsoring this very special cleanup!

聽Register for Nothin’ But Sand

聽Reserve Headphones


Celebrate Earth Month at Heal the Bay Aquarium-

In-Person

Saturday, April 15, 11 AM – 4 PM PST

The award-winning Heal the Bay Aquarium located at the Santa Monica Pier has planned an afternoon filled with fun Earth Month activities.聽 Featuring exciting exhibits and demonstrations, it’s a great way for the entire family to experience the Santa Monica Bay and observe the local animals that call it home.

Heal the Bay Aquarium’s Earth Month Celebration schedule includes:

Aquarium Opens (11 AM): Check out our award-winning animal exhibits, visit with sharks and sea stars in the touch tanks.

Wildlife Observation Station (12:00 PM to 3:00PM): Visitors who walk to the west end of the Pier will find our wildlife station, staffed and stocked with binoculars and bird identification guides.

Sea Star Feeding (1:00 & 3:00 PM): Help Heal the Bay Aquarium staff feed our sea stars their favorite lunch in our Tide Pool Touch Tanks.

Story Time (2:00 PM): Join the Heal the Bay team for a whale of a tale at our Earth Month Themed Story time.

Mini Dance Party (12:00 PM to 4:00 PM (hourly): At the top of each hour, join Heal the Bay in our Dorothy Green Room for a Mini Dance Party to celebrate all things Earth Month.

All Afternoon: Enjoy an eco-themed crafts station, short films, and hands-on pollution displays including our 6-foot-tall Marina the Mermaid art installation (artists Artist Andrea Martina Isenschmid).

Visit Heal the Bay Aquarium


Stussy x Heal the Bay Collaboration Launch – Virtual & In-Person

Saturday, April 22, 11 AM – 4 PM PST

St眉ssy and Heal The Bay have collaborated on a capsule collection consisting of two
ecocycle blank co-branded t-shirts, and a mesh hat. 100% of the proceeds from this collaboration will be donated to Heal the Bay to further support our marine and coastal watershed protection work!

St眉ssy and Heal The Bay is available at Stussy.com and LA Chapter only on Saturday, April 22, 2023.

Check out the Collaboration


Earth Day 2023 Celebration at Heal the Bay Aquarium -In Person

Saturday, April 22, 12 PM to 4 PM PST

Did you miss out on the Earth Month fun last Saturday? Enjoy the encore of exciting exhibits and activities as Heal the Bay Aquarium celebrates Earth Day on April 22. Come celebrate the wonder of our Earth’s oceans with touch tanks, sea star feeding sessions, story time, an eco-themed crafts station, short films, an on the pier Wildlife Observation Station, photoshoots with our 6-foot-tall Marina the Mermaid art installation, and mini dance parties at the top of each hour.

Earth Day at Heal the Bay Aquarium


Gardena Willow Wetlands Earth Day Celebration & Blue Table Talk- Virtual & In-Person

Saturday, April 22, 11 AM – 11:30 AM

Start the Morning with a wetlands cleanup at Johnson Park from 8 AM -10 AM, then look for the shimmering Heal the Bay Blue Table at the Gardena Willow Wetlands Earth Day Celebration from 10 AM-1 PM where there will be informational booths, food, music, a scavenger hunt, games, and arts and crafts!

Join us for the Blue Table Talk at 11 AM, and take a seat at the table to chat about some of Los Angeles鈥 most pertinent water topics. Sit down with our watershed experts from Heal the Bay, the Natural History Museum, and TreePeople to ask us anything about water, and its connection to our local habitats. This pop-up roundtable is FREE and open to the public.聽

Can’t make it to the Blue Table in Person? Follow @cityofgardenaca to join us at the table on Facebook LIVE and then check out @healthebay for the replay!

Watch the Blue Table Talk LIVE


SURFScape -A Consumer-First Experiential Event -In Person

Saturday April 29, 9AM – 5PM & Sunday 30, 9AM – 3PM PST

Enjoy an immersive consumer experience featuring the best brands in surf and the outdoors, produced by the Surf Industry Members Association, supporters of the Nowcast Beach Report Card. The event is free to attend and family friendly. Stop by the Heal the Bay Beach Report Card table as you check out tons of outdoor gear demos, listen to inspirational conversations around environmentalism and sustainability, enjoy food, and watch local surfers catch waves.

SURFScape


Earth Month April eDNA Community Science Event with MPA Watch -In Person

Saturday, April 29, 10 AM -1 PM

Interested in meeting volunteers and participating in cutting-edge science? We are excited to reintroduce a fun and social Heal the Bay event that will occur monthly in the Malibu Marine Protected Area transects! Heal the Bay is partnering with UCLA again to collect sea water samples in Malibu for an environmental DNA scientific testing program with PhD candidate, Moriah Byrd. All marine life leaves traces of DNA in their environment. eDNA water testing analyzes the quantification of biodiversity in a standardized way within a marine ecosystem, making it an incredible tool to monitor Marine Protected Areas.

Register ASAP as spots are limited.

REGISTER for eDNA Training


BioBlitz in the Marsh- In-Person

Saturday April 29, 10 AM – 11:30 AM

Heal the Bay鈥檚 Safe Clean Water Program team is adventuring out to Madrona Marsh in Torrance, CA on 4/29 at 10am for an Earth Month BioBlitz. Heal the Bay staff will instruct guests on how to safely observe and document wildlife while discovering more about local marsh ecosystems. Come walk in nature to collect data as part of the聽2023 LA City Nature Challenge, sponsored by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the California Academy of Sciences.

Registration on Eventbrite in advance is required.

Register ASAP as spots are limited.

Register for BioBliz


Heal the Bay Earth Month 2023 Tabling Calendar聽

Check out our list of Earth Month events hosted by some of our favorite social, environmental, and partner organizations across Los Angeles. Stop by Heal the Bay’s Outreach table while you’re enjoying Earth Month fun around Los Angeles County this April.

LA Galaxy Easter Egg Hunt and Earth Month Celebration, Dignity Health Sports Park: Track and Field Stadium, April 7, 12 PM

FOLAR Earth With Us Great LA River Cleanup,Golden Shore Marine Biological Reserve, 201 Golden Shore Long Beach, CA 90802, April 22, 8 AM

LASAN Earth Day LA Expo, Hyperion, 12505 Vista Del Mar, Playa del Rey, April 22, 10 AM

Earth Day at Gardena Willow Wetlands, 10 AM

20th Annual Earth Day Celebration at the Beverly Hills Farmers Market, April 23, 9 AM

The City of Alhambra Utilities Department 2023 Eco Fair, 100 S Second Street Alhambra, CA 91801, April 23, 8 AM -1 PM

Earth Day Celebration 2023 at Wilderness Park, Wilderness Park 1102 Camino Real, Redondo Beach, CA, 90277, April 22, 2 PM & April 23, 3 PM

Kids Beach Cleanup Event (Plus Traveling Tidepool, Arts & Crafts, & More), Dockweiler Youth Center, Playa del Rey, CA, April 29, 9 AM- 12 PM


All Earth-Month-Long at Heal the Bay聽

Take the Pledge: Start your Commitment to Conservation聽

All Month Long

Take Heal the Bay and Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s ONE Water pledge for a step by step guide on saving water indoors and outdoors during the drought. The Dashboard.Earth app connects Angelenos to the climate solutions that matter most in their neighborhoods and makes it easy and rewarding to take action. Together, we can brighten Los Angeles’ water future.

Capture the QR code above to begin the ONE Water Pledge. Already on a mobile device? Download the App.

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FREE Beach Wheelchair Rentals & Beach Exploration with Heal the Bay Aquarium – In person

All Month Long 9:30 AM – 11 AM PST

Need a Beach Wheelchair to enjoy some fun in the sun? Everyone should be able to enjoy a day at the beach, so come to Heal the Bay Aquarium to access our manual, beach wheelchairs, available for FREE public rentals.

Pick Up Location Details

Heal the Bay’s Beach Wheelchair rental program helps provide accessibility to one of nature鈥檚 most inspiring and critically important resources, and was made possible thanks to funding from The Coastal Conservancy. Learn more about our Beach Wheelchair Rental Program: https://healthebay.org/beach-wheelchairs-santa-monica-pier/


Gear Up for Earth Day with Heal the Bay

All Month Long

Nothing says Earth Day like swag from Heal the Bay. Use promo code EARTHLOVE for 15% off everything in the Heal the Bay online store from April 1 – April 30, 2023.

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Make waves for a sustainable future in Greater Los Angeles, by making your Earth Month donation to Heal the Bay.

  • Inspire Local Youth: Your $25 gift can provide 1 student with a marine science education experience.
  • Tackle Toxic Plastics: Your $50 gift can train 2 volunteers to fight plastic pollution with strong advocacy.
  • Restore Our Rivers: Your $100 gift can underwrite 1 week of water quality monitoring in local freshwater spots
  • Protect Clean Water: Your $500 gift can fund campaigns to hold polluters accountable for pollutants in the Bay

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Heal the Bay thrives because of our amazing volunteers. We are only able to celebrate those achievements because of the time, dedication, and support that our volunteers so graciously donate.

Each and every volunteer is instrumental to the success of our organization whether educating the public, reaching out to communities, aiding in aquarium care, or picking up plastic at the beach.聽 Volunteer passion for the environment through selfless dedication is the ture heart and soul of Heal the Bay and drive our accomplishments toward achieving the mission to protect coastal waters and watersheds of Southern California. On March 23, 2023, we took time to celebrate our volunteers at Heal the Bay’s 33rd Annual Volunteer Appreciation Party and Award Ceremony.

Sharing our 2022 Volunteer Success:

  • Aquarium volunteers contributed 4,005 hours to the Heal the Bay Aquarium, supported field trips, assisted in caring for our animals, and guided visitors through the experience of our touch tanks.
  • MPA Watch volunteers conducted 489 surveys in 2022 to monitor human activity in the Palos Verdes and Malibu Marine Protected Area sites.
  • Thousands of volunteers picked up trash from the greater L.A.鈥檚 shorelines and neighborhoods last year. On Coastal Cleanup Day, 4,583 volunteers removed more than 11,298 lbs. of trash and 313 lbs. of recyclables from our waterways and neighborhoods.

Our Key Stone Award Winners

The Jean Howell Award and the Bob Hertz Award are Heal the Bay鈥檚 lifetime achievement awards. This years聽 award winners, like any keystone, have become central to the success of many Heal the Bay programs. A special thank you to our 2023 awardees.聽

Tim Cheung – Jean Howell Award

Tim began volunteering with Heal the Bay in 2017. Through the years, Tim has been instrumental to the Beach Captains team for Nothin鈥 But Sand and Heal the Bay public cleanup programs. In the past, Tim represented Heal the Bay at tabling events in the community and helped spread our virtual Knowledge Drop education series at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. Tim brings a strong sense of community to each cleanup and ensuring all team members feel informed and involved along the way, commanding the attention of our cleanup volunteers at Nothin鈥 But Sand every month, ensuring a safe cleanup. At the end of the cleanup, Tim leads the charge, weighing the trash and transporting large items to the dumpster, often by himself. There is no task Tim isn鈥檛 willing to do.聽

John Wells – Jean Howell Award

Since joining Heal the Bay’s MPA Watch Program in February 2020, John has conducted more than 385 MPA Watch surveys. His surveys alone account for more than 25% of the submitted surveys on behalf of Heal the Bay鈥檚 MPA Watch program.聽 John鈥檚 increased resolution in our data came during an exceptional need to record unprecedented changes in human recreational and consumptive behavior in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic. John was awarded the MPA Watch Super Healer award in 2020 and his dedication to Heal the Bay has only grown stronger, serving as an active volunteer, a Beach Captain at monthly NBS beach clean-ups, Suits on the Sand events, and at Heal the Bay鈥檚 Coastal Cleanup Day in 2022. John鈥檚 contributions are invaluable

John Reyes – Bob Hertz Award

John Reyes attends every Heal the Bay volunteer opportunity. There isn鈥檛 a cleanup program or Heal the Bay event that John is not involved. Since 2018,聽 John has captained Coastal Cleanup Day sites in Dockweiler State Beach and even organized his own Adopt-A-Beach team, “the Beach Reacher’s”, to clean up would-be marine debris from L.A.’s inland watershed. John is always one of the first volunteers to sign up to support special Heal the Bay events such as the Trash Bowl and Golf Open. Even during the rainy seasons John joins our Storm Response cleanup efforts. His leadership at Nothin But Sand Cleanups are instrumental and he has volunteered at over 100 Suits on the Sand cleanups. The current Beach Programs team wishes to express the greatest gratitude for John鈥檚 dedication and outstanding support.

Celebrating our Super Healers

All Heal the Bay volunteers are wavemakers, but some go above and beyond. We are especially proud to recognize the following outstanding individuals with the 2022 Super Healer Awards:

Sharon Lawrence – Development Super Healer

Actress, philanthropist, and leader Sharon Lawrence is known to most as the multiple Primetime Emmy-nominated and SAG Award-winning actress from hit shows like NYPD Blue, Grey’s Anatomy, Monk, Law and Order: SVU, Rizzoli & Isles, and Curb Your Enthusiasm (among many others). She has also been a change-maker at Heal the Bay for more than a decade, working tirelessly wherever she is needed, serving most recently as Chair of the Heal the Bay Board of Directors. Always the advocate for Heal the Bay, Sharon uses her voice and passionate influence to raise unquantifiable amounts of support and donations that have helped fund some of our most important science, policy, and outreach programs. A wavemaker like Sharon is truly one in a million.

聽Amalfi Estates (Anthony Marguleas) – Corporate Super Healer

Anthony Marguleas of Amalfi Estates often notes: 鈥渨e are a philanthropic company that excels at selling real estate. Alongside our commitment to our clients stands our commitment to our community.鈥 Every year the Amalfi team donates 10% of their commissions to Heal the Bay among six L.A. charities. Their mighty team of 10 works enthusiastically to support local nonprofits donating more than $2 million since 2015.In just the past two years, nearly $35,000 has benefited Heal the Bay. When it comes to corporate responsibility, Amalfi Estates leads by example, setting the standard for what organizational-wide philanthropy can look like in the 21st century.

Andrea Martina Isenchmid – Communications Super Healer

Andrea is an actress, filmmaker, and artist, but we all know and love her as one of our most dedicated Beach Captains and Speakers. She has been a Heal the Bay volunteer for many years, inspiring countless attendees at our Nothin’ But Sand Beach Cleanups with her energizing educational safety talks. Rain or shine Andrea is always ready to help setup at the beach and a reliable amplifier promoting Heal the Bay’s messaging and advocacy through social media often serving as聽 impromptu social media photographer for the Communications team.聽 This year, Andrea furthered聽 her passion for Heal the Bay’s mission聽聽 with the completion on聽 “Marina the Mermaid”. the single-use plastic recycle. This 6-foot-tall recycled mannequin is adorned with pounds of items collected during Nothin’ But Sand Cleanups and her own self-cleanups. Her artwork will be on display during the entirety of Earth Month this April at the Heal the Bay Aquarium to raise environmental awareness.

聽Celina Banuelos – Public Programs Super Healer

Celina is a real Ocean Hero, dedicating extensive time and effort to interpreting marine life for the public at the Heal the Bay Aquarium. She has helped countless visitors interact with ocean creatures for the first time at the Aquarium while exercising unwavering advocacy for the animals that live in Santa Monica Bay. Celina inspires people to connect with the ocean. We are so grateful to you, Celina, for all that you have done!

Hannah Benharash – Public Programs Super Healer

Hannah is a Heal the Bay regular and is always open to new experiences. Whether breaking down birthday parties or interpreting at the touch tanks on busy weekends, Hannah has made our aquarium programs unforgettable. Hannah is not only enthusiastic and dedicated but also extremely well-known for their unmatched button-making skills! We are grateful to Hannah for always coming to our rescue at the Heal the Bay Aquarium when it is needed the most.聽聽

聽Sophia Sorady – Public Programs Super Healer

Sophia is a Wave Maker who has inspired her peers to take action in support of environmentalism. An amazing advocacy teacher for all our new public programs volunteers, Sophia dedicated time to the Aquarium by ensuring guests responsibly interacting with our animals. . Sophia is a kindhearted leader with compassion for the ocean, and we are proud to have her on our team.

Ren Capati – Public Programs Super Healer

Ren is a stellar Public Programs volunteer. Extremely knowledgeable, dependable, and always curious, Ron has been volunteering with the Public Programs team for more years than some senior staff members!聽 We love talking with Ren about discoveries in marine science, and are grateful for Ren鈥檚 infectious passion as part of the Heal the Bay team!

聽Jim Mckenzie – Aquarist Super Healer

Jim has been volunteering with the Aquarium Operations department for the past two years and is an invaluable member of our team. Jim’s curiosity and dedication to protecting our environment shines through in all the work he does with Heal the Bay. From helping keep exhibits squeaky clean to spending time out on the sand supporting a beach cleanup, Jim has done it all. He is easily our best and most reliable first mate on Dorothy for kelp collections and overall incredible support to have at the Heal the Bay Aquarium. We’re so honored to have Jim be part of our team!

聽Russell Blakely – Super Healer

Russell first volunteered with Heal the Bay in 2021, as a Beach Captain to help clean coastal areas. Russell is a tireless hero of our Nothin鈥 But Sand cleanups; always working and giving his all. Recently, Russell has developed into one of our leading Corporate Outreach volunteers, helping at Suits on the Sand cleanups, and on more than one occasion assisting at TWO cleanups in ONE day. Russell is our Suits on the Sand superstar.聽

聽Brant Kim – Super Healer

Brant started as a Beach Captain in 2022 and has exhibited multitalented capabilities of leading any station. Exceptionally helpful with uplifting all our new digital initiatives at our cleanups, such as the electronic check-in, waiver check, and DEI survey, Brant’s commitment to community outreach聽 streamlines Heal the Bay’s Beach Program initiatives.

Alice Pak – Super Healer

Alice began volunteering with Heal the Bay in 2022 and has been an excellent addition to the Beach Captains team.聽 Alice hit the sand running, quickly optimizing our Nothin鈥 But Sand event procedures, most importantly, our registration booth protocols. With聽 Alice at the registration desk the Beach Programs volunteer teams are able to check-in 300 attendees in an hour or less.聽 In addition to serving as聽 a teacher on the sand for other volunteers, Alice is one of our most dependable Beach Captains.

David Eddy -Super Healer & Keystone Starfish

David started volunteering his data analysis skills to Heal the Bay in 2020. In the past, he helped our water quality scientists assess dissolved oxygen levels in the Channel Islands Harbor, painting an impressive overview of the data through visuals and a results overview video. This year, David has started volunteering his time and expertise to help the Beach Programs team revive the marine debris database, integrating our historic data with current datasets, and helping Heal the Bay bring our historic marine debris database into a modern, accessible format. Thank you for making that dream a reality!聽

Tasha Kolokotrones – Science Super Healer

Tasha Kolokotrones has been an MPA Watch volunteer with Heal the Bay since 2021. Inspired by a聽 love of the outdoors, Tasha has conducted more than聽 50 MPA watch surveys earning honorable mention as one our most active MPA Watch volunteers. In 2022, Tasha submitted more surveys than 90% of our other program volunteers. Thanks to Tasha, our Marine Protected Area in Palos Verdes had consistent MPA Watch monitoring in 2022, an accomplishment all on its own!聽聽

Special thanks to Golden Road Brewing for supplying refreshments and cheer!聽



California’s major infrastructure was built in the 20th century, but neither our laws nor conveyance systems were designed to address the challenges faced by climate change in the 21st century. Here鈥檚 everything you need to know about that infrastructure from the Heal the Bay Climate Action Team in Part 3 of our 3-part series, Commit to Conservation.

In past blogs, we鈥檝e broken down the drivers behind the California drought and types of actions that make a real difference as we work to close the large and growing gap between the water we use and the water made available by nature. Even with the recent deluge of snow, torrential rains, and resulting flooding, precipitation was insufficient in permanently reversing the drought. The good news is that we have the technology we need for reliable drinking water and Heal the Bay is actively championing projects that will move us toward a more resilient and equitable future.

BACKGROUND

Water systems in California were designed based on historic patterns of precipitation that are being altered by climate change, but the primary cause of water scarcity in our region is not climate 鈥 it’s governance. Rights to our State鈥檚 water supply go all the way back to the 19th century, and our major infrastructure was built in the 20th century, and neither our laws nor conveyance systems were designed to address the challenges faced by climate change in the 21st century. The good news is that the potential for bolstering local water sources and supply in Southern California is enormous, and there are already plans and policies underway to make Los Angeles more resilient! And we believe in the idea of a 鈥One Water鈥 approach, which prioritizes investments in demand management and new supplies based on reliability, affordability, equity, public health, and environmental impacts.

ACHIEVING WATER RESILIENCY THROUGH CONSERVATION AND EFFICIENCY

Conservation and efficiency are two important tools when considering water use in a time of drought.

Conservation involves the conscious choice to change an action, like watering your lawn only one day a week instead of every day. While efficiency means taking the same actions as before but using less water (usually with the help of technology), for example, adding water-efficient showerheads to your bathrooms.

We talk a lot about water conservation and efficiency as strategies that the people of Los Angeles can take to help ensure that every on California can have access to safe clean water as that need increases. Reducing demand is often the cheapest and fastest way to close the large and growing gap between supply and demand. Saving water also helps save energy. In fact, a study by UC Davis revealed that during the 2015 drought, Californians saved more energy through water savings than all the energy efficiency programs combined. And when individuals actively choose to use less water, it makes a remarkable difference in water availability for everyone. Technology already exists that could save up to 1 trillion gallons a year statewide and the greatest potential for water savings exists right here in the South Coast Region, owing in part to the sheer potential of people (9.86 million in LA County alone) who could improve their water efficiency. To help encourage communities to use water more efficiently, the State Water Resources Control Board is working on a rulemaking to establish unique water efficiency budgets for each urban water supplier in California under a broader water resilience framework to 鈥Make Conservation a California Way of Life”.

The greatest potential for water saving and new supply exists in the South Coast Region, which includes Los Angeles County.聽 From The Untapped Potential of California鈥檚 Urban Water Supply: Water Efficiency, Water Reuse, and Stormwater Capture, published by the Pacific Institute in April 2022.

Barriers to increasing water efficiency include:

1) 聽Water efficiency rebate programs that are often not accessible to low-income households because they require customers to purchase new appliances first and then wait several weeks (or more) for a rebate;

2) Water supplier revenues tied to how much water they sell, so there is a disincentive to invest in programs that reduce sales, and

3) Water suppliers won鈥檛 pay nearly as much for saved water as they will for new water.

Heal the Bay and our partners are working with our local water suppliers to implement solutions to these challenges, including:

  • Improving access to water efficiency programs by advocating for state and federal funding for programs that provide direct installation of new plumbing fixtures, appliances, and landscapes for income qualifying customers.
  • Advocating for water agencies to adopt water rates that incentivize improved efficiency while also allowing water suppliers to recover fixed costs, like the budget-based rates used by Irvine Ranch Water District and Western Municipal Water District.
  • Increasing the return on investment by advocating for water agencies to leverage the energy savings embedded in water savings to co-fund rebate programs with energy utilities.

CAPTURING STORMWATER 鈥 Waste Not, Want Not

Unlike wastewater, most stormwater in Los Angeles is not treated nor cleaned before it reaches our rivers and ocean. Our current stormwater infrastructure was built to protect against flooding, but when rain comes, the first flush of water from urbanized areas sweeps up trash and other contaminants which flow through our storm drains, dumping polluted water directly into our waterways, beaches, and ocean. Capturing LA鈥檚 rainwater offers opportunities to improve water quality in rivers and the ocean and at least triple the amount of stormwater captured for water supply (currently around 33 billion gallons per year).

The architects of the archaic system could not have foreseen the impacts of accommodating large population increases and ensuing development let alone a future of climate change and drought.聽 They viewed water through a very different lens as something to control because it was a flooding danger rather than an integral resource and the lifeblood of ecosystems. Since 1985, Heal the Bay has seen first-hand the symptoms and impacts of stormwater contamination on our beaches and ocean as our volunteers and staff pick up thousands of pounds of trash each year.聽 In fact, our Beach Report Card predictably downgrades our beaches after each rainstorm, and therefore, swimmers should consider staying out of coastal waters for at least 3 days after a rain event.

If we utilize natural solutions for stormwater capture, we could get even more benefits like carbon sequestration, cooler temperatures, recreational opportunities, and so much more. Heal the Bay works with the LA Regional Water Quality Control Board to track action under the Regional Stormwater Permit聽and has also engaged with a local dedicated source of funding as Watershed Coordinators for the Safe, Clean Water Program.聽 One good example of this is our project at Inell-Woods Park, which will be located in South Los Angeles, in a neighborhood that lacks green space within the Compton Creek Watershed.聽 The objective is to use native plants to reduce long-term potable water requirements and capture and treat stormwater to irrigate the park.

Stormwater Capture Projects: a) The Oxford Retention Basin Regional Stormwater Capture Project, b) The Ladera Park Stormwater Improvements Project, c) a rain garden in The Elmer Avenue Neighborhood Retrofit Project. Photos by Annelisa Moe/Heal the Bay.

SUSTAINABLE GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT 鈥 A Huge Underutilized Opportunity

One element you need for successful stormwater infiltration projects is clean groundwater. Here in the Los Angeles area, groundwater reservoirs offer vast natural water storage potential. And while they are heavily regulated to avoid over-pumping, much of this water is contaminated from historical industrial pollution. So, in recent years, groundwater has only made up about 10% of local water supply. Groundwater remediation, therefore, offers removal of pollution that is currently underlying communities, a boost for subsurface ecosystem health, and an increase in local water supply, as long as these stores are also regularly refilled by other local water sources. Across LA County, there are roughly 5.8 billion gallons of available unused groundwater storage space where we can store recycled wastewater and captured stormwater for future use; and if we do not use this storage space, the ground could compact, actually removing that storage potential.

In addition to some groundwater being polluted, we also have aquifers that are salty. Desalination can be used to clean up salty groundwater, and that process is safer, less expensive, and less energy intensive than ocean water desalination. It also provides multiple benefits by removing salt from our groundwater and providing water supply.

SAFE WASTEWATER RECYCLING 鈥 Rinse and Repeat

Treated wastewater (water used indoors that gets cleaned to a high standard at a wastewater treatment facility) has traditionally been discharged to the ocean or rivers, which is a hugely missed opportunity because that water can be used again to reduce our dependence on imported drinking water. We currently reuse some of this water indirectly to recharge groundwater reservoirs, or directly for irrigation through the purple pipe system or recycled water fill stations, but we could be using more. In fact, California is finalizing regulations to allow for direct potable reuse, defined by the EPA as a “water recycling method that involves the treatment and distribution of water without an environmental buffer”. 聽Although the concept has received some non-scientific skepticism along the way, it is actually very safe and is already in use around the world and even here in Southern California. Orange County鈥檚 Groundwater Replenishment System (GWRS) is the world鈥檚 largest purification system providing treated water to near-distilled quality that is then piped to a location where it naturally seeps into a groundwater basin that provides about 70% of the potable water needs for 2.4 million OC residents.

Skeptical about drinking recycled water?聽 Fun fact: Half of all water systems that serve more than 10,000 people provide de facto recycled water, or water that includes wastewater that was discharged from an upstream source. Purified recycled water is actually much cleaner than most supplies because of the extensive treatment and purification process that takes place at these advanced treatment facilities.

Many facilities in Southern California are already preparing their facilities to include direct potable reuse as a means to increase the use of recycled wastewater, including the Metropolitan Water District Pure Water Southern California Project, the Las Virgenes-Triunfo Pure Water Project, the City of Ventura Water Pure Project, and the City of LA鈥檚 Hyperion 2035 Project. Though it will take time and funding for these facilities to be fully operational, Heal the Bay has already visited some demonstration facilities as we continue to advocate for smart policies that ensure high quality water, as well as environmentally safe and sustainable practices.

The Las Virgenes-Triunfo Demonstration Facility turns wastewater into highly purified water that exceeds federal and state drinking water standards in 3 very high-tech steps: 1) Membrane Filtration, 2) Reverse Osmosis, and 3) Advanced Oxidation. At the end of the Demonstration Facility tour, guests can taste test the final product. Photos by Annelisa Moe/Heal the Bay.

DESALINATION 鈥 The Option of Last Resort

We regularly receive questions about the possibility of desalination.聽Click here to read 5 reasons to be wary of desalination.聽 The takeaway is that it is extremely expensive, energy intensive, and environmentally harmful and should only be used when all other options have been exhausted.

SECURING LA’S WATER FUTURE

With limited resources to counter the myriad impacts of the climate crisis, we must prioritize cost-effective projects that maximize local water and offer multiple benefits to support thriving communities and ecosystems. With better access to water efficiency programs, a multi-benefit stormwater capture network, sustainable groundwater management, and increased use of safe water recycling, we can reduce our reliance on imported water.

Successful water resiliency work requires bringing together the variety of water agencies and governmental departments to work collaboratively for the shared benefits not only for the future of the Southlands but for California water resilience, as a whole. For two years, Heal the Bay has led this conversation by hosting a 鈥淥ne Water鈥 symposium attended by water agency leaders that serves to drive momentum toward collaborative solutions for these major infrastructure projects.聽 You can take part in Heal the Bay鈥檚 work as we continue to track all of these efforts and advocate for a holistic One Water approach to build a resilient water future for LA.

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Written by the Heal the Bay Science and Policy Department in Collaboration with the Climate Action Team. Leading a dynamic team of scientists, policy experts, outreach specialists, educators, and advocates in pursuit of its clean water mission.



Drought or flood?鈥 Can both be true at the same time?鈥 Yes, and here鈥檚 what you need to know with Heal the Bay CEO Tracy Quinn in Part 2 of our 3-part series, Commit to Conservation.

RECENT DRAMATIC STORMS, known as atmospheric rivers, have caused major damage including flooding, mudslides, and sinkholes.鈥 Up in the mountains, the California snowpack is 208% of average for this date and Mammoth Mountain is having its second snowiest January on record.鈥 We are receiving record precipitation this year which can be good for our water supply but the drought is not over.鈥 We know it is confusing, but it doesn鈥檛 have to be. Here are 3 things you need to know about water supply in CA.

Drought & Water Supply Recovery – 3 Limiting Factors

First, we started this year with a huge water deficit. About 40% of California鈥檚 water supply comes from groundwater and we have been over pumping our groundwater supplies for decades. When we don鈥檛 get enough surface water (i.e., rain and snowmelt that flows to our streams, rivers, and lakes), water users 鈥 mostly agriculture – use even more groundwater.聽 And because 19 of the 20 hottest years on record have occurred since 2001, and groundwater has been largely unregulated in California, our groundwater supplies have significantly declined. In fact, in the last 100 years, California drained enough fresh water to provide every person on Earth with a 30-year supply of drinking water. According to the USGS, it would take about 50 years to naturally recharge our groundwater supplies.

As Charming Evelyn, Sierra Club Water Chair, explains above, we鈥檝e pumped so much groundwater that the land has sunk 鈥 in some places over 28 feet. It鈥檚 a phenomenon called 鈥渟ubsidence.鈥

Second, we can鈥檛 be certain that our immense snowpack will translate to full reservoirs that will carry us through the summer and fall when we need it most. California gets about 30% of our water from the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada mountains and our water system relies on the snow melting slowly over the spring and summer, filling reservoirs as water is discharged to meet the needs of our homes, businesses, and farms and leaving enough to get us through the fall until it rains and snows again. Unfortunately, climate change models have predicted, that we will now see early snowfall followed by unusually warm springs 鈥 in fact, this is what we saw last year. Between sublimation (snow evaporating off the mountain), overgrown forests with thirsty trees, and exceptionally dry soils, only a small fraction of our frozen reservoir (i.e., the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada and Colorado Rocky Mountains) even reached the lakes and reservoirs that supply our statewide water system. The same may happen this year.

While we watch California reservoirs rebound after 2 decades of drought, Lake Mead on the Colorado River, where SoCal gets about 30% of its water, remains critically low.聽 According to Brad Udall, a water and climate researcher at Colorado State University, we would need five or six years of 150% snowpack to refill Lake Mead and Lake Powell, the major reservoirs along the Colorado River.聽 Brad says we have to continue to plan for the worst year, and we agree!

Third, we鈥檙e not capturing all this rain.聽 In the first three weeks of 2023, Los Angeles received over 8 inches of rain, which translates to about 568 billion gallons of water. Much of this water falls on impervious surfaces like roofs and streets, picks up pollutants from cars, pet waste, and trash and flows briskly to the nearest stormdrain and eventually out to the ocean. Recent investments helped us capture 33 billion gallons of this winter’s rainfall in Los Angeles County, but the majority of this precipitation is still flushing out to the ocean through stormdrains and rivers. Heal the Bay has been at the forefront, working to make sure we pursue new capture projects that offer multiple benefits through LA County鈥檚 Safe, Clean Water Program.

馃憠 Get involved: Learn more about the stormwater projects featured in this post.

Managing Water Supply and Usage

Now is not the time to take our foot off the accelerator when it comes to saving water. Every drop of water we save now is a drop that will be available to us for essential uses during the dry times ahead. And remember, saving water saves energy 鈥 especially if you are reducing your use of hot water. So using less water helps save money on your utility bills and helps fight climate change!聽 Here are our top water saving tips you can do to create climate resilient communities.

Source: EPA.gov

1. Install a FLUME device. Flume is a product that you can easily install on your water meter that sends water use data straight to your phone and can even alert you to a leak. According to the EPA, Americans lose 1 TRILLION gallons of water through household leaks each year. Right now, LADWP customers can get a FLUME device for just $24 (plus tax). Get personalized information on how you can save water right from an app on your phone!

2. Transform your thirsty turf landscape into a beautiful native garden. Did you know that the number one irrigated crop in America is turf grass?聽 In Los Angeles, 50% to 70% of our drinking water (most of which we transport from hundreds of miles away) is used to irrigate landscapes, mostly grass that isn鈥檛 suitable for our climate. Right now LADWP customers can get up to $25,000 to remove the turf grass around their home. What can you do? Sign up for the rebate, remove your 鈥渘on-functional turf鈥 and replace it with a landscape that captures stormwater, maintains healthy soils, and is full of native plants to reduce your home’s irrigation demands:

A bioswale can capture water for home landscaping. Photo by Tracy Quinn/Heal the Bay

    • Connect your roof gutters to a rain barrel or bioswale and grade your landscape to capture the rain that falls on your property instead of letting it run into the street. This also prevents pollution like dirt and oils from cars and pet waste from reaching our rivers and beaches.
    • Maintain healthy soils because they retain more water. Healthy soils also capture and store carbon helping to mitigate the impacts of climate change.
    • Plant native plants, which, in addition to benefiting your water supply, can help maintain SoCal鈥檚 incredible biodiversity by providing food and shelter for birds, bees, and butterflies. This is especially important as our planet is currently facing a mass extinction event because human activity has reduced natural habitats. Find locally appropriate native plants here in Los Angeles at Theodore Payne Nursery.

馃挰 ASK THE EXPERTS: Should I replace my grass with artificial turf? Short answer – No!聽 Artificial turf is usually made from plastic, prevents insects from digging and aerating soils, pollutes the soils underneath it and the water that runs over it, and can contribute to extreme heat issues. For even more reasons to avoid it, check out this article.聽

The Westwood Neighborhood Greenway is maintained by volunteers who restore native plant species near the Westwood/Rancho Park E Line station in support of local biodiversity. Photo by Bria Royal/Heal the Bay

3. Start a water-wise lifestyle trend in shared living spaces. Not a homeowner? Not a problem! Whether you’re renting an apartment or living in a student dorm, there are still plenty of daily actions we can all take to use less water. Check out more water savings tips for shared living spaces. And never underestimate the power of collective action. You can talk to your neighbors about the benefits of native landscaping, and collectively approach your landlord to request that they replace the turf in your complex. Suggestions from several tenants along with enticing rebates could sway your landlord and land you with some beautiful new outdoor vistas.

馃挜#Commit2ConserveChallenge: Once you’re ready to take action, download the Dashboard.Earth app for step by step guides, links to rebated materials, and an easy-to-use checklist curated by Heal the Bay and Metropolitan Water District. With our ONE Water Pledge, you can begin tracking your progress in managing your home’s water supply and usage. Then, share your progress on social media to spread the word.聽

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馃挜 GET THE APP – DASHBOARD.EARTH

HEAL THE BAY DROUGHT PORTAL

SUPPORT OUR WORK


Written by Tracy Quinn. Leading a dynamic team of scientists, policy experts, outreach specialists, educators, and advocates in pursuit of its clean water mission, Heal the Bay CEO Tracy Quinn is responsible for setting new science and policy goals, expanding Heal the Bay Aquarium as the premier marine science education destination in Southern California, and increasing community action throughout Greater LA. Tracy has dedicated her life to improving water quality in our rivers and ocean and ensuring safe, reliable, and affordable water for all Californians.



Storm drains dump untreated, unsafe water on our beaches 鈥 Heal the Bay鈥檚 Storm Response Team gives you the safety guidelines to get out a cleanup and stop the trash before it reaches our marine life neighbors at the coastline.

EACH TIME IT RAINS, the Los Angeles storm drain system rushes untreated water and all the debris that litters our streets, gutters, and sidewalks right into our beaches and coastline. Cleaning up the mess made by these trash-freeways in our community calls for the help of our trusty Storm Response Team! Made up of Heal the Bay staff and dedicated volunteers, the Storm Response Team acts as the last line of defense, removing garbage washed out of the storm drain system and local waterways before it reaches聽the ocean. Interested in conducting your own Storm Response Team deployment? Please remember to stay safe and follow our extended self-guided cleanup safety tips for post-storm and atmospheric river conditions.

馃搫 Download: Self-Guided Cleanup Tips – Storm Response and Atmospheric River Conditions

When the call goes out, the Team puts on their rubber boots, gloves, and raincoats and goes out during low tide or during a break in the rain to local catch basins and outfalls, gathering as much trash as they can. Pollution and litter upstream are swept through the system and, while the Heal the Bay team attempts to get out there quickly, a barrage of atmospheric rivers dousing our southland can make it extremely difficult to stave the flow of trash, debris, and unsafe particulates. We are encouraged by the volunteers who have reached out about helping to do individual clean ups, but we must warn that it is a filthy job and volunteers should proceed with caution.

Heal the Bay is constantly advocating for upstream solutions that would stop the flow of pollution into our local waterways and prevent the need for storm response teams in the future. Reducing single-use plastics and polystyrene, the technical term for products commonly referred to as聽styrofoam, has a significant impact on reducing the amount of trash that reaches our oceans.聽聽

Heal the Bay also supports efforts to collect, treat, and use stormwater. Measure W, passed in 2018, provides funding for local stormwater capture, treatment, and reuse projects. These efforts will drastically reduce our reliance on imported water, reduce pollution in our local waterways and coastal waters, and reduce risks to public health.

馃憠 Get caught up: Learn more about Heal the Bay鈥檚 efforts in getting Measure W passed and it鈥檚 implementation.

Tips for all Angelenos during #LARain:聽

  • Stay out of the water. The County of Los Angeles Environmental Health Department and Heal the Bay urge residents and visitors to avoid water contact at Los Angeles County beaches for at least 72 hours following rain event.聽Check our Beach Report Card website or app before your next swim along the coast.
  • Avoid low-lying areas and stay up to date on all local weather alerts
  • Know the flow. Test your water knowledge, and share insights about rainwater runoff and where Los Angeles gets its water in your community.

ACTION LINK(S)

DOWNLOAD STORM CLEANUP SAFETY TIPS

JOIN THE STORM RESPONSE TEAM

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Written by Stephanie Gebhardt. As our Beach Programs Manager, Stephanie organizes Heal the Bay鈥檚 beach cleanups and community beautification projects. With experience in sustainability consulting and science communication, she unites Angelenos in protecting what they love.



Join community scientists in California to observe and document the King Tides on January 22, 2023. This extreme high tide event provides a glimpse of what we face with climate-driven sea level rise. Your images will contribute to a better understanding of how to adapt to and combat the climate crisis.Get a glimpse of last winter’s King Tide.


UPDATED JANUARY 5, 2023

Capture the King Tide this January

King Tides are an exceptionally large wave phenomenon that can only be witnessed a few times a year. These massive waves only come to shore when the moon is closest to the Earth and can teach California so much about the changing coastline, if their impact can be captured.

Thank you to everyone who helped us document the King Tide in December.聽 Your images and observations will lead to a better understanding of the effects of sea level rise on California’s coast.

This January, Heal the Bay is calling on all local beach lovers to hit the sand once again to help us document these huge waves.聽 Taking pictures and recording this natural phenomenon can help climate scientists predict the future of Californias coastline in preparation to adapt to and combat the climate crisis. Last year your observations were vital to prepare Los Angeles for a future affected by climate change and we need your help once more.

The first King Tides event of this season will occur on January 21, 2023, at 8:10 AM, and then January 22, 2023, at 8:57 AM. Once again, we are calling all of those who love the California coast to help capture the King Tide.

Join us in January

Don’t want to face the big wave alone? Come capture the King tide with Heal the Bay and other climate community members at our either of group science events during the January phenomenon.

King Tides Science and Celebration
Santa Monica, Los Angeles County

1600 Ocean Front Walk, Santa Monica
January 22, 2023
8:15am-10:30am
Presented by聽Climate Action Santa Monica
Join Heal the Bay and Climate Action Santa Monica聽for a gathering by the ocean to witness and document this natural phenomenon. 聽At the precise moment of the most intense gravitational force on the ocean, help community scientists take photos of the waves and their reach, and document the impact on local infrastructure, as part of the California King Tides Project. Then head over to the Heal the Bay Aquarium for educational demonstrations to learn about the planetary forces that cause the King Tides to occur. Enjoy refreshments while you meet and mingle with other members of the climate community and learn about the effects of climate on sea levels. Come celebrate the power of the ocean and deepen your connection to nature when we Capture the King tide together.聽 More info and register.

 

King Tides Science and Celebration
Manhattan Beach, Los Angeles County

2 Manhattan Beach Blvd, Manhattan Beach, Ca 90266 – Base of Manhattan Beach Pier (by the bike path/clock tower area)
January 22, 2023
8:30 am -9:15 am
Presented by The Roundhouse Aquarium
Head to The Roundhouse Aquarium Teaching Center for a King Tides community science event with Heal the Bay. Hit the beach and help document the King Tide by capturing pictures of this ocean phenomenon alongside community and climate scientists as part of the California King Tides Project.聽 Join in the community discussion and discover the relationship between sea level rise and climate change alongside students and other climate community members.

 

PUBLISHED DECEMBER 13, 2021

Sea Level Rise

Before we get into the details of this year鈥檚 King Tides event, let鈥檚 begin with the larger context of sea level rise. Humans are polluting Earth鈥檚 atmosphere with greenhouse gases (GHGs) like CO2, primarily through the burning of fossil fuels, driving average global temperatures up at an unprecedented rate.

Oceans have helped to buffer this steady pollution stream by absorbing 90% of our excess heat and 25% of our CO2 emissions. This, among myriad impacts, has increased sea temperatures, causing ocean water to expand. The combination of ocean water expansion and new water input from the melting of landlocked glaciers results in rapid sea level rise.

Take a look at images from the NOAA Sea Level Rise Viewer. Light blue shows areas expected to flood consistently as sea levels rise. Bright green shows low-lying areas vulnerable to flooding from groundwater upwelling as seawater intrusion increases.聽

According to the 2021 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Report, sea level will rise 2 feet by 2100 even if efforts are made to lower GHG emissions, and possibly as much as 7 feet by 2100 if we continue with 鈥渂usiness as usual鈥 (i.e., burning fossil fuels at the current unsustainable rate). Rapid sea level rise threatens beach loss, coastal and intertidal habitat loss, seawater intrusion into our groundwater supply (which could contaminate our drinking water supply and cause inland flooding from groundwater upwelling), as well as impacts from flooding or cliff erosion on coastal infrastructures like roads, homes, businesses, power plants and sewage treatment plants鈥攏ot to mention nearby toxic sites.

King Tides: A Glimpse of Future Sea Levels

Ocean tides on Earth are caused by the gravitational pull of the moon (and the sun, to a lesser extent) on our oceans. When the moon is closest to Earth along its elliptical orbit, and when the moon, earth, and sun are aligned, gravitational pull compounds, causing extreme high and low tides called Perigean-Spring Tides or King Tides. These extreme tides provide a glimpse of future sea level rise.

Image courtesy of NOAA National Ocean Service.

In fact, King Tides in Southern California this December and January are expected to be 2-3 feet higher than normal high tides (and lower than normal low tides), providing a clear snapshot of what the regular daily high tides will likely be by 2100.

 

What is being done

Many coastal cities in California have developed Local Coastal Programs in coordination with the CA Coastal Commission to address sea level rise. The Coastal Commission is also developing new sea level rise guidance for critical infrastructure, recently released for public review. Unfortunately, if we continue with 鈥渂usiness as usual,鈥 the rate of sea level rise will occur much more quickly than we can adapt to it, which is why we need bold global action now to combat the climate crisis and limit sea level rise as much as possible.

What you can do

Motivated people like you can become community scientists by submitting King Tides photographs the weekend of December 23 and 24, 2022 to contribute to the digital storytelling of sea level rise. These photos are used to better understand the climate crisis, to educate people about the impacts, to catalog at-risk communities and infrastructure, and plan for mitigation and adaptation. Join the Coastal Commission in their CA King Tides Project!

Get involved in the December 23 and 24 #KingTides event

Instructions from the CA Coastal Commission:
1) Find your local high tide time for one of the King Tides dates.
2) Visit the shoreline on the coast, bay, or delta.
3) Be aware of聽your surroundings to ensure you are safe and are not disturbing any animals.
4) Make sure your phone’s location services are turned on for your camera and then take your photo. The best photos show the water level next to familiar landmarks such as cliffs, rocks, roads, buildings, bridge supports, sea walls, staircases, and piers.
5) Add your photo to the King Tides map either by uploading it via the website or by using the Survey123 app.

 

In the Los Angeles area? Here are some areas we expect will have noticeable King Tides:

In Palos Verdes, we recommend: Pelican Cove, Terrenea Beach, White Point Beach, and Point Fermin. In Malibu, we suggest: Paradise Cove, Westward Beach, Broad Beach, El Pescador State Beach, and Leo Carrillo State Beach.

ACTION LINK(S)

FIND LOCAL KING TIDE TIMES

SEE PREVIOUS KING TIDE PHOTOS

SUPPORT OUR WORK


Written by Annelisa Moe. As a Coastal and Marine Scientist for Heal the Bay, Annelisa works to keep our oceans and marine ecosystems healthy and clean by advocating for strong legislation and enforcement both locally and statewide. She focuses on plastic pollution, marine protected areas, sustainable fisheries, and climate change related issues.