Top

Heal the Bay Blog

Category: Los Angeles

Heal the Bay Reusable is Beautiful. Earth Month 2024

Celebrate Earth Month and all things reusable with Heal the Bay!

Join our “Reusable is Beautiful” Earth Month activities to help you ditch single-use plastic and keep our oceans healthy.

Every year, billions of pounds of single-use plastic flood our oceans, threatening the health of our planet. This month and every month, Heal the Bay is committed to raising awareness about choosing reusable options over single-use plastic and keeping our waterways clean, safe, and beautiful for everyone.

Fun, inspiring activations are happening all month for everyone ‚Äď individuals, families, schools, and more! Grab your reusable water bottle, sunscreen, and friends for climate action fun near you!


Heal the Bay Earth Month 2024 Calendar of Special Events

ūüĎáūüĎáūüĎáSCROLL DOWN TO SEE THE FULL LIST OF EVENTS and get involved this Earth Month with #ReusableIsBeautiful events and activities from Heal the Bay and our partners! ūüĎáūüĎáūüĎá


Get Safety Talk Certified for Earth Month -FREE

Monday, March 25, 2024: VIRTUAL or IN PERSON

Become a Heal the Bay Safety Talk Speaker!

Our fun, impactful Nothin’ But Sand cleanups rely on fantastic volunteers like you! As a Safety Talk Speaker, you’ll educate beachgoers about Heal the Bay’s mission, impact, and safety practices. This is your chance to:

  • Educate thousands of volunteers¬†about Heal the Bay’s work. (e.g., 20,000+ lbs of trash removed in 2023!)
  • Lead confidently¬†by learning best practices for beach cleanups and authentic land acknowledgments.
  • Make a real difference¬†for our coastlines and wildlife.
  • Gain public speaking skills to connect everyone from elementary school kids to the CEO’s of some of the region’s most prominent local brands and the science and policy that fuels Heal the Bay’s impact.

Two-Step Training:

  1. Virtual Safety Talk Certification: March 25, 6:00 PM
  2. In-Person Beach Captain Training: April 20, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM (Santa Monica Beach, Tower 1550)

Ready to dive in? Sign up today!

 Get Safety Talk Certified


Touch Tanks on Top of The Pier – FREE

Friday, April 5 12 PM -2 PM 

Join our Aquarium experts and LACC for an extra special touch tank on the Santa Monica Pier next to the Heal the Bay Welcome Center! Get close to some incredible aquarium animals and learn all about the fascinating creatures that call our oceans home.

FREE EVENT

 Plan Your Visit to the Santa Monica Pier


Plastic Pollution Advocacy Training (VIRTUAL) -FREE

Tuesday, April 16, 2024, 6 PM – 7 PM

Calling All Environmental Warriors!

Join Heal the Bay and 5 Gyres for a FREE virtual advocacy training to combat plastic pollution in California. Learn the power of grassroots activism and how to lead impactful campaigns targeting local and state plastic reduction efforts at our VIRTUAL training.

Master the tools to make a difference:

  • Understand key plastic pollution policies.
  • Craft persuasive messages for decision-makers.
  • Make impactful calls to representatives.
  • Submit compelling written comments on legislation.

Become a voice for change:

Gain essential advocacy skills and join the movement for a plastic-free future. Let’s make our voices heard and pave the way for a healthier planet!

Help Heal the Bay 5 Gyres depose the disposables!

Join our plastic policy workshop with Heal the Bay’s Coastal and Marine Scientist, Emily Parker and 5 Gyres’ Policy & Programs Director, Alison Waliszewski. Gain insights on the plastic bag ban, LA‚Äôs 2023 plastic laws, Heal Bay‚Äôs anti-plastic bills, and why 2024 might be a game-changer for plastic reduction in LA!

 Register to get the Zoom Link


April Nothin’ But Sand Beach Cleanup -FREE

Saturday, April 20, 10 AM – 12 PM @ Santa Monica Pier

Earth Month Beach Cleanup Leveled Up!

Join Heal the Bay’s Nothin’ But Sand at Santa Monica Beach on April 20, 2024 (10 am-12 pm). Fun awaits! Enjoy spin-the-wheel games, trash relay races, and a marine science exploration station, and win #ResusableisBeautiful raffle prizes! All attendees gain FREE ACCESS TO HEAL THE BAY AQUARIUM for the day! Help clean & celebrate a healthier planet with 1000+ other volunteers at LA’s biggest Earth Month cleanup of 2024!

¬†Register for Nothin’ But Sand


Celebrate Earth Day at Heal the Bay Aquarium 

Saturday, April 20, 11 AM – 4 PM

Dive into Earth Month at Heal the Bay Aquarium! Fun, educational exhibits & live demonstrations await ocean enthusiasts of all ages. Explore the wonders of Santa Monica Bay & meet the fantastic local animals that call it home.

Saturday, April 20, 11 AM – 4 PM

Come to Heal the Bay Aquarium under the Santa Monica Pier for a non-stop day of Earth Month fun!

  • Take an Earth Month pledge
  • Enjoy crafts, chalk art, and face painting
  • Learn about our state flower with California Poppy Kits
  • Participate in an Earth Month Scavenger Hunt
  • Collect limited Edition Earth Month Pins
  • Take 20% off reusable items in the gift shop

Join the Earth Month Beach Cleanup to get free entry to the Heal the Bay Aquarium Earth Month Celebration!

 Plan Your Visit


2024 LA City Nature Challenge BioBlitz -FREE

Saturday, April 27, 2024

Heal the Bay’s Safe Clean Water Program returns with an Earth Month BioBlitz! Heal the Bay staff will host two events with the 2024 LA City Nature Challenge, sponsored by the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County and the California Academy of Sciences. Join us on Saturday, April 27th, at Bixby Marshland or Fern Dell in Griffith Park for an afternoon of ecological exploration!

 RSVP to JOIN


Wake & Dance with DAYBREAKER @ Santa Monica Pier

Saturday, April 28, 2024, 6 AM to 9 AM

Join the DAYBREAKER Peace Tour to the Santa Monica Pier! Rise and shine to help protect what you love. Some proceeds will support Heal the Bay programs that keep our coastal waters and watershed clean and healthy for all.

 Get Your Tickets


Rising Tides Discussion Panel @ Hermosa Beach Community Center -FREE

Sunday, April 28, 2024, 3 PM

Our coastline is shrinking. But what can Los Angeles do about it?

Attend the discussion panel of the year at Hermosa Beach Community Center, “Rising Tides: Exploring LA’s Readiness for Sea Level Rise,to find out.

Join three leading experts on climate change, environmental policy, and community resilience as they sit down to unpack the challenges facing LA’s coast and explore solutions for a more sustainable future:

Discover how fossil fuels impact the Pacific shore and delve into equitable approaches to protecting our communities. RSVP now to reserve your FREE seat!

 REGISTER TO ATTEND


Stussy x Heal the Bay Collaboration Launch 

Friday, May 3, 2024, 9 AM

St√ľssy x Heal the Bay returns with a limited-edition capsule collection launch!¬† 100% of the proceeds from this collaboration will be donated to Heal the Bay to support our marine and coastal watershed protection work!

This exclusive collection of St√ľssy x Heal the Bay retail will be available at Stussy.com.

Get your shopping cart ready and mark your calendar for the 2024 collection drop on May 3, 2024. Last year’s collection sold out in 15 minutes, raising over $75,000 to protect our coastal waters and watershed.

 

¬†St√ľssy.com


All Earth-Month-Long at Heal the Bay 

Did you miss out on Earth Day fun? Enjoy these Heal the Bay activations all month long!

Heal the Bay Reusable is Beautiful. Earth Month 2024


 FREE Beach Wheelchair Rentals @ Heal the Bay Aquarium 

April 2024, 9:30 AM – 11 AM

Beach Wheelchair at Santa Monica PierNeed a beach wheelchair to enjoy some fun in the sun? Everyone should be able to enjoy a day at the beach, so come to Heal the Bay Aquarium to access our manual beach wheelchairs, which are available for FREE public rentals.

Pick Up Location Details

Heal the Bay’s Beach Wheelchair rental program helps provide accessibility to one of nature‚Äôs most inspiring and critically essential resources and was made possible thanks to funding from The Coastal Conservancy. Learn more about our Beach Wheelchair Rental Program: https://healthebay.org/beach-wheelchairs-santa-monica-pier.


Earth Month: Battle of the Babies @ Heal the Bay Aquarium

Join Our Self-guided Beach Cleanup Competition – All Month Long

Are you feeling competitive this Earth Month? Are you ready to defeat the trash on Santa Monica Beach? Then join the Battle of the Babies all month long at Heal the Bay Aquarium!

Lead your team in a self-guided cleanup of Santa Monica Beach, choose which animal you would like to support, and at the end of the month, we’ll tally the total pounds collected by each fandom to see which baby will emerge triumphant!

Stop by Heal the Bay Aquarium to grab a FREE bucket and support your favorite fishy friend: the adorable swell shark pup or the darling California skate baby. This Earth Month, let’s see who emerges victorious in the battle against beach pollution!

Questions? Contact Heal the Bay Aquarium


“Hold the plastic, please!” #Selfie Challenge

Enter for a chance to win Heal the Bay Swag in this social media challenge

Calling all eco-warriors and selfie champions! Help your favorite restaurant ditch plastic for a chance to win awesome Heal the Bay gear .

Here’s the deal:

1) Ask your fave restaurant to “Hold the plastic, please!”

2)Snap a selfie with your HTPP card‚ôĽÔłŹ

3)Post it to social media using #ReuableisBeautiful and tag @healthebay

Win epic Heal the Bay swag for showing your support!

Need a reminder card? Grab one at our #ResuableisBeautiful station, Heal the Bay Aquarium on the Santa Monica Pier, or download a digital one to flash at your next meal.

PSA to Restaurants! LA’s new plastic laws mean less waste and more savings for you! Confused about utensils, takeout containers, or the bag ban? We’ve got all the info on our website.¬†

Let’s make #EarthMonth plastic-free and selfie-worthy!

Download a Hold the plastic, please! Card


Protect What You Love with a Heal the Bay Member”Ship”

Join our crew! Climb aboard the SS Heal the Bay Membership!

Our Member‚ÄúShip‚ÄĚ is full of passionate and dedicated Heal the Bay supporters working to ensure that coastal waters and watersheds in Southern California are safe, healthy, and clean for generations to come. Thanks to the generous annual support of our Member‚ÄúShip‚ÄĚ Crew, we can further our efforts through science, education, community action, and advocacy.¬†Become a member and join our Crew!

Member‚ÄúShip‚ÄĚ OPTIONS & BENEFITS

$55: Membership for one adult*
$95: Membership for two adults* 

$95: Family Membership for two adults + up to 2 children*

Member” Ship” Includes:

  • Free admission to Heal the Bay Aquarium for one year
  • 25% discount on guest admission tickets
  • 10% discount on retail purchases at the Heal the Bay Aquarium Gift Shop
  • 5% discount on Aquarium Science Camp
  • Heal the Bay’s digital Blue Newsletter
  • AQ Movie Night
  • Special Member-Only Tide Pool Excursions

Become a Member TODAY!


Gear Up for Earth Day with Heal the Bay 

Level up your drip while leveling up the ocean!

Nothing says #ReuseableIsBeautiful this Earth Day like swag from Heal the Bay! Shop comfy appeal, unique gifts, and reusable goods, all for a great cause!

Shop Heal the Bay


Heal the Bay Earth Month 2024 Tabling Calendar 

Check out our list of Earth Month events hosted by some of our favorite social, environmental, and partner organizations across Los Angeles. Stop by Heal the Bay’s Outreach table while you’re enjoying Earth Month fun around Los Angeles County this April.

Gardena Spring Equinox Earth Day Event, Johnson Park, 1200 W 170th St. Gardena, CA, March 17, 9 AM – 12 PM

Pepperdine Earth Day Celebration, Pepperdine University, 24255 Pacific Coast Hwy, Malibu, April 9, CA, 11 AM – 2 PM

Generation Earth/Tree People 2nd Annual Environmental Youth Summit, 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA, April 11, 9 AM – 10:15 AM and 12:30 PM – 1:30 PM

LA County Sanitation Districts, Earth Day Celebration, 1955 Workman Mill Rd, Whittier, CA, April 13, 1o AM – 2 PM

City of Azusa Outdoor Recreation and Eco Fair, Memorial Park, North Recreation Center Parking Lot, 340 N Orange Ave, Azusa, CA, April 13 10 AM – 1 PM

Tarzana Neighborhood Council 11th Annual Earth Day Festival, Tarzana Park, 5655 Vanalden Ave, Tarzana, CA 91356, April 13, 10 Am – 2 PM

STEAM Expo, 2368 Pearl St, Santa Monica, CA, April 13

Resilient Palisades Earth Day 2024, Palisades Village Green, 15280 Sunset Blvd, Pacific Palisades, CA, April 14, 9 AM Р1 PM

SONY Pictures Entertainment Earth Month, April 18

Wild for the Planet, LA Zoo, 5333 Zoo Drive, Los Angeles, CA, April 20 – April 21, 10 AM – 4 PM

South Bay Parkland Conservancy Earth Day Event, Wilderness Park, Redondo Beach, April 21, 10 AM – 1 PM

CSUDH 2024 Earth Day Festival, April 23, 9 AM – 3 PM

CSU Dominguez Hills 17th Annual Earth Day Festival, 1000 E Victoria St, Carson, CA, 10 AM – 2:30 PM

Loyola High School Earth Week Fair, 1901 Venice Blvd, Los Angeles, CA, April 25

Paradise Canyon Earth Week Fair, Paradise Canyon Elementary, 471 Knight Way, La Ca√Īada Flintridge, CA, April 26, 6 PM – 8 PM

2024 Arts and Literacy Festival, Virginia Avenue Park Campus, Santa Monica, April 27, 10 AM Р2 PM

Beverly Hills 21st Annual Earth Day, 9300 Civic Center Dr, Beverly Hills, CA, April 28, 9 AM – 1 PM


 Celebrate the Earth beyond April

APPLY TODAY – 2024 Coastal Clean-Up Day Poster ARTIST

Calling all ocean-loving artists!

Let your artwork advocate for our ocean this Coastal Cleanup Day!

Win $1,000 and see your artwork all over Los Angeles County on the official Heal the Bay Coastal Cleanup Day poster!

Submit a portfolio of your work and a concept for a poster that captures the essence of our theme: “Reusable is Beautiful.”

**Think vibrant colors, powerful messages, and inspiring imagery to showcase the beauty of reusables and the importance of protecting our oceans. **

Show us your vision!

Submissions are accepted until May 31st, 2024. See full details and application here!

Enter to win the opportunity to become our 2024 COASTAL CLEANUP DAY Poster Artist!

Apply Here


Bring Back the Beach Gala

Celebrate #ReusableIsBeautiful

dress

You are cordially invited to our Bring Back the Beach Gala on May 16, 2024.

As a fundraising benefit for Heal the Bay, this exclusive West Coast event welcomes hundreds of business, political, entertainment, and environmental leaders. Reserve your tickets to our biggest event of the year! 

Our 2024 GALA is SINGLE-USE PLASTIC-FREE because at Heal the Bay, we believe¬†¬†#ReusableIsBeautiful! Help keep single-use plastic out of our watershed when you ‚ÄúBRING BACK THE BEACH‚ÄĚ this May.

GET TICKETS


Coastal Cleanup Day Site Captain Training

Become a Site Captain or Co-Captain and host a Heal the Bay cleanup site in LA County for Coastal Cleanup Day 2024!

 

LA’s biggest volunteer event returns!

Join Heal the Bay’s Coastal Cleanup Day on Sept 21st, 2024.

In 2023, over 7,000 Heal the Bay volunteers removed over 16,000 lbs. of trash and 400 lbs. of recycling from 97 miles of beach, river, underwater, and trail cleanup sites!  Help us make an even more significant impact in 2024.

Want to lead a cleanup site? Sign up for Site Captain training on Thursday, 5/30/2024, 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM. More Site Captain training dates to come.

+The deadline to sign up to be a CCD Site Captain is 7/31/2024.

SIGN UP


Make waves for a sustainable future in Greater Los Angeles by making your Earth Month donation to Heal the Bay.

DONATE 



Heal the Bay’s Angler Outreach Program Manager, Frankie Orrala, shares the program’s positive impacts and successes from over the last 20 years.

Heal the Bay‚Äôs Angler Outreach Program (AOP) is celebrating 20 years! This program is designed to educate pier and shore anglers in Los Angeles and Orange County about the risks of consuming fish contaminated with toxins such as dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane‚ÄĮ(DDT) and¬†polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).¬†Created in 2003, AOP is a component of the¬†Fish Contamination Education Collaboration (FCEC) and managed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of a far-reaching public education and outreach program. Notably, the program also works in association with federal and state agencies as well as local community organizations.

The FCEC was established to address a major contamination site (aka Superfund site) off the coast of Los Angeles, along the Palos Verdes shelf. DDT and PCBs were historically discharged into the ocean near the Palos Verdes Peninsula, pollution which still exists in the sediment today. These toxins can travel through the food chain into fish and potentially have negative impacts on human health if the fish are eaten; certain species of fish and certain areas are more likely to be contaminated.

The goal of the AOP is to educate anglers about this contamination and share which fish should be avoided. During visits to different piers in Southern California, Heal the Bay’s educational team has interacted with diverse fishing communities and outreach is conducted in multiple languages. Heal the Bay is proud to have a team of bilingual staff who have educated Southern California pier anglers in multiple languages, including: Spanish, Chinese, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Khmer and Russian.

Since its inception 20 years ago, Heal the Bay’s AOP team has educated more than 190,000 pier anglers. Along the way, we have heard many stories and learned a lot about the people who frequently fish on our local piers. We appreciate these anglers and the knowledge and experiences they share with us.

Awards Received at the National Level

In 2009, the EPA presented two prestigious awards to the Fish Contamination Education Collaborative. FCEC was recognized for its work to protect the most vulnerable populations in Southern California from the health risks of consuming fish contaminated with DDT and PCBs; the other award was given to Heal the Bay and all FCEC partners in Los Angeles for Achievement in Environmental Justice.

On behalf of the AOP and Heal the Bay, I traveled to Washington D.C.  to receive the distinguished award in recognition of Citizen Excellence in Community Involvement. This award is presented annually to an individual or community group working with a Superfund team for outstanding achievements in the field of environmental protection.

Heal the Bay was thrilled to be selected to present to the FCEC among other national projects. The recognition was significant as it confirmed Heal the Bay’s work is truly protecting the health of all people, especially communities with economic and social disadvantages.

 

2009 Award Winner: Frankie Orrala of Heal the Bay receiving the Citizen Excellence in Community Involvement and Environmental Justice Achievement Awards

In addition to accepting this award in Washington D.C, in 2009,¬†I traveled to¬†Ecuador in South America, along with scientists from the National Fisheries Institute (Instituto Nacional de Pesca) as well as professors, researchers and students from the University of Guayaquil. We came together to talk about FCEC’s efforts to monitor pollution and educate the public about its effect on human and environmental health.

The international interest our program receives is an honor; the AOP team is busy building on these relationships and with more communities as they are facing similar problems as Southern California.

Continuing to advance environmental justice is a critical objective of our work. Moving forward, Heal the Bay’s AOP program remains committed to educating and protecting chronically underserved populations in the region, many of whom are exposed to higher rates of pollution compared to the general population.

In closing, there are many reasons for the AOP team’s continued success, from our great team members to the communities we work with, to the experts who are providing us with advice. All of it wouldn’t be possible without Heal the Bay’s dedicated supporters and for that we say THANK YOU!


To learn more about our program, visit www.pvsfish.org and if you want to join our bilingual team call us at 310-451-1500 or visit our site at www.healthebay.org

View en Espa√Īol



Check out the full 2023 Coastal Wrap-Up Book:

DOWNLOAD THE 2023 WRAP-UP BOOK


Check out our Coastal Cleanup Day Highlight Stats! 

Updated September 27, 2023, 3:00 PM

Coastal Cleanup Day 2023 Stats

Los Angeles County Numbers (Heal the Bay Sites)

  • 47 Cleanup Sites Reported
  • 7, 337 volunteers
  • 1, 646 volunteers who brought their own cleanup supplies
  • 16,211 pounds of trash
  • 429 pounds of recycling
  • 97.5 miles of beach, river, underwater, and neighborhoods sites cleaned.
  • 15 Inland Cleanups, 31 Coastal Cleanups, 2 Dive Cleanups

According to the California Coastal Commission as of 5PM 9/24 with 50% reporting (including Heal the Bay)

  • 25,570 volunteers participated statewide.
  • Those volunteers picked up 126,605 pounds of trash at cleanup sites all along California.
  • An additional 7,041 pounds of recyclable materials were collected.¬†
  • A total of 133,645 pounds or 67 tons of refuse were removed from watersheds all over California.¬†

Thank you to all who joined Heal the Bay in Los Angeles County on Coastal Cleanup Day 2023, and a special thank you to our 2023 Coastal Cleanup Day Sponsors:

A Wave of gratitude for our 2023 Coastal Cleanup Day Sponsors

2023 Coastal Cleanup Day Sponsors:

Pacific Premier Bank @pacificpremierbank

Ocean Conservancy @oceanconservancy

Water Replenishment District @wrdsocal

City of Santa Monica @cityofsantamonica

Department of Beaches and Harbors, Los Angeles County @lacdbh

California Coastal Commission @coastalcommission

Northrop Grumman @northropgrumman

Water for LA @waterforla

Councilwoman Traci Park (Council District 11) @councilwomantracipark

Councilmember Tim McOsker (Council District 15)

Councilwoman Katy Yaroslavsky (Council District 5) @cd5losangeles



Plastic pollution is a major problem in Los Angeles because plastic makes up the majority of LA County‚Äôs litter, according to a UCLA report commissioned by LA County‚Äôs Sustainability Office.¬† LAist recently reported that about 85% of plastic is NOT recycled, “instead, it fills up landfills or ends up in the street and gets flushed into storm drains and ultimately the ocean, causing harmful and deadly consequences to ocean life” (Restaurants In Unincorporated LA County Are Now Banned From Using Plastics, Erin Stone). Consumers are often unaware that when plastic is recycled, thrown away, or improperly put in recycling bins it often ends up in the same place and is always detrimental to the environment.

For several years, Heal the Bay has been working with LA City and County to help create legislation aiming to break the harmful plastic cycle.  And finally, there is some hope.    

In 2023, THREE new laws are making big waves for the environment, and ultimately, reducing plastic in our oceans.¬† They may sound confusing, but the result is simple, less plastic! Here is Heal the Bay’s quick breakdown of those laws:¬†

Citywide Changes

Good Riddance to Bad Rubbish

The City of Los Angeles, in accordance with the first phase of the LA Sanitation and Environment (LASAN) Comprehensive Plastics Reduction Program, passed several exciting laws in 2022 to reduce waste and curb plastic pollution in our region. Since then, two of those laws have officially gone into effect as LA takes major steps to reduce single-use plastics. 

So Long, Styrofoam

1) The sale of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS), commonly known as Styrofoam, has been banned. 

The LA City law went into effect on April 23, 2023, and asserts that no restaurant or retail store can give, sell, distribute, or offer products made of EPS to any consumer. This includes cups, plates, bowls, takeaway containers, egg cartons, and even ice coolers. The first phase will only impact establishments with more than 26 employees and will expand to include all restaurants and retail establishments in April 2024. 

Shop Till You Drop the Plastic Bag

2) The City expanded its existing bag ban to include all retail shops.

The LA City ‚Äúplastic bag ban‚ÄĚ has been in place for nearly a decade, banning local LA grocery stores from handing out single-use plastic bags and charging ten cents ($0.10) for alternative single-use carryout bags.¬† This law was a means to reduce plastic in the environment and encourage the public to invest in reusable totes bags instead. In 2023, the ban on single-use plastic bags was expanded to large retail stores.¬† Now in effect, retail establishments that employ more than 26 employees should no longer offer flimsy single-use plastic bags to consumers and will offer alternatives¬†or paper bags¬†for a $.10 fee.¬† As of July 2023, all other shops including apparel stores, farmers markets, and food or beverage facilities will join the list of places to ban the bag.

If you suspect your favorite clothing store, watering hole or eatery is unaware of these new rules, let them know!  Education is the most important part of creating change in your community. You can also give LA Sanitation a call and let them know, too at 213-485-2260.  

LA Countywide Changes

This year has brought a big environmental win to even more places beyond the municipality limits, impacting communities all over Los Angeles County.

Sticking a Fork in the Single-Use Plastic Problem

3) LA County Foodware Ordinance:

In April 2022, LA County celebrated Earth Month with the passage of unprecedented legislation to reduce single-use plastics and curb plastic pollution and it is already being rolled out.  As of May 1st, you should no longer be offered single-use plastic foodware or Styrofoam products at restaurants in the unincorporated areas of LA County!  But this ordinance does so much more:  

  • Phases out single-use foodware that is not compostable or recyclable. Since plastic is neither, that means no more single-use plastic foodware!¬†¬†
  • Phases out the sale of products made of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) aka Styrofoam.¬†
  • Requires full-service restaurants to use reusable foodware for customers who are dining on-site (including reusable plates, cups, bowls, silverware).¬†

The ordinance will go into effect in phases but, for now, if you see a restaurant not complying, be sure to let them know or contact LA County Public Works. 

A Huge Relief and Cause for Hope
Heal the Bay volunteers have removed more than 4 trillion pieces of trash from LA County Beaches in the past 3 decades, and sadly, 80% was plastic. These ordinances are just the first steps on a long journey to end the local dependency on plastic in Los Angeles. With LA leading the way, the rest of California is following along with the passage of bills like SB54.  There is finally real hope for a plastic-free future in LA with safe clean watersheds across the State.  

RESOURCES 

UNINCORPORATED LA COUNTY MAP

LIST OF UNINCORPORATED AREAS IN LA COUNTY

REUSABLE LA COALITION

DEEP DIVE INTO THE ORDIANCE WITH LAIST;

UCLA REPORT

MORE ON SB54

 



Resumen ejecutivo
Heal the Bay se enorgullece en publicar el cuarto informe anual del bolet√≠n River Report Card. Este informe proporciona un resumen de las calificaciones de la calidad del agua en √°reas recreacionales del condado de Los √Āngeles (L.A.) durante el 2021. Los r√≠os, arroyos y lagos del condado de L.A. reciben multitudes de visitantes cada a√Īo y son vitales para satisfacer las necesidades recreacionales, √°reas verdes y pr√°cticas culturales de la comunidad. Desafortunadamente, muchos sitios de recreaci√≥n en el condado de Los Angeles tienen problemas de contaminaci√≥n por bacterias indicadoras fecales (FIB), lo que indica la presencia de pat√≥genos que pueden causar infecciones, irritaci√≥n de la piel, enfermedades respiratorias y gastrointestinales. Nuestro objetivo es resaltar las preocupaciones sobre la calidad del agua, abogar por mejorar este problema y brindar a los miembros de la comunidad informaci√≥n necesaria para mantenerse seguros y saludables cuando disfrutan de sus √°rea recreacionales locales.

  • De los 35 sitios calificados durante el verano de 2021, el 59 % obtuvo luz Verde en su calificai√≥n (lo que indica que no hay riesgos para la salud debido a la calidad del agua); El 17% obtuvo luz Amarilla (riesgo moderado para la salud) y el 24% luz Roja (alto riesgo para la salud).
  • Heal the Bay ampli√≥ el informe del bolet√≠n River Report Card para incluir seis nuevos sitios de monitoreo en la parte baja del r√≠o de L.A. desde Maywood hasta Long Beach. Si bien estos sitios no est√°n oficialmente designados para la recreaci√≥n, las personas acuden regularmente a esta parte del r√≠o. Los datos brindan informaci√≥n para los usuarios y nos dan una perspectiva para futuros esfuerzos de revitalizaci√≥n del r√≠o.
  • Siete sitios de monitoreo no excedieron los lilmites permitidos de bacterias pat√≥genas, obteniendo as√≠ calificaciones ecol√≥gicas del 100 %. La mayor√≠a de estos sitios est√°n ubicados en el sector del Angeles National Forest.
  • Todos los seis sitios de monitoreo de la parte baja del r√≠o de L.A. experimentaron una muy baja calidad de agua, lo que los hace acreedores a los peores sitios de la lista. Las concentraciones de bacterias a menudo fueron diez veces mayores a los est√°ndares de calidad de agua.
  • Despu√©s de los sitios de la parte baja del L.A. River, Tujunga Wash en Hansen Dam encabez√≥ la lista de los peores sitios recreacionales con un 94 % de calificaciones que obtuvieron luz Roja, porcentaje m√°s alto visto en este sitio desde que se inici√≥ el informe del River Report Card.
  • Por cuarto a√Īo consecutivo, a la altura de Rattlesnake Park en el r√≠o de L.A. esta otro sitio en lista de los peores sitios recreacionales. Este sitio popular recibe un flujo constante de contaminaci√≥n bacteriana cerca del drenaje pluvial a la altura de la calle Fletcher Ave para quienes pescan, hacen kayak o caminan por sus aguas.
  • Las Virgenes Creek a la altura de la calle Crags Road experiment√≥ un gran aumento en el porcentaje de calificaciones con luz Roja con respecto al a√Īo anterior. Este sitio en el Parque Estatal Malibu Creek ocupa la posici√≥n nueve en la lista de los peores sitios recreacionales.
  • Las √°reas con desarrollo urbano tienden a recibir las peores calificaciones que las √°reas naturales, y la mayor√≠a de los peores sitios en la lista se cuentran en los paisajes urbanos. Los sitios en la cuenca del r√≠o San Gabriel y la cuenca superior del r√≠o de L.A. se encuentran en √°reas menos desarrolladas y se ven menos afectados por la escorrent√≠a urbana.

Heal the Bay estuvo conmovido por el gobernador Gavin Newsom quien firm√≥ el Proyecto de Ley de la Asamblea (AB) 1066 en 2021. Este proyecto iniciar√° un proceso para proteger la salud p√ļblica y la calidad del agua en sitios recreacionales como r√≠os, lagos y arroyos de California. El proyecto de ley, escrito por el asamble√≠sta Bloom y patrocinado por Heal the Bay, asignar√° al Consejo de Monitoreo de Calidad del Agua de California (California Water Quality Monitoring Council) para hacer recomendaciones a la Junta Estatal de Agua (State Water Board) de un programa uniforme de monitoreo de sitios recreacionales de agua dulce en todo el estado para diciembre de 2023. El programa del Consejo incluir√° definiciones propuestas para sitios recreacionales y “sitios prioritarios recreacionales de contacto con el agua” en California. El Proyecto de Ley AB 1066 abordar√° las disparidades en el monitoreo de la calidad del agua entre sitios recreacionales de agua dulce y playas costeras.

Heal the Bay se compromete a mejorar la calidad del agua en las cuencas hidrogr√°ficas del condado de Los √Āngeles mediante la creaci√≥n de √°reas verdes. Las √°reas verdes, mejoran la calidad del agua local, aumentan la reutilizaci√≥n y el suministro de agua, reducen el carbono y mitigan el efecto aislado de calor urbano. Adem√°s de proporcionar √°reas de recreaci√≥n y h√°bitat para los animales vida Silvestre, pueden tambi√©n funcionar como soluciones esenciales de m√ļltiples beneficios para las aguas pluviales. Como ejemplo podemos mencionar la creaci√≥n de Inell Woods Park: un nuevo espacio verde de m√ļltiples beneficios y dise√Īado por la comunidad que se construir√° este a√Īo en el sur de Los √Āngeles. Heal the Bay construir√° el parque de aguas pluviales en colaboraci√≥n con el concejal de la ciudad de Los Angeles Curren Price Jr. y miembros de la comunidad para capturar, tratar y reutilizar la escorrent√≠a urbana y proporcionar espacios verdes y recreativos a la comunidad. Los proyectos de beneficios m√ļltiples como este son de uso eficiente y efectivo de nuestros contribuyentes que sirven tanto a las necesidades comunitarias como ambientales.



AS THE YEAR CONTINUES on through May, the weather begins to warm, melting away the worries of the winter and bringing us into the joys of the spring! The level of sunshine spikes, encouraging us to go out and play, and what better way to ring in the rising heat than by going to the beach? Los Angeles has many beautiful beaches to visit, so it’s important you pick the one that’s right for you! Read below to see which one aligns most harmoniously with your zodiac sign: 

Aries

Aries, your best beach is the Leo Carrillo Beach on the west side of Malibu. This beautiful beach is connected to a gorgeous state park where there are trails, sea caves, and reefs all available to enjoy. You’ll never get bored!


Taurus

Taurus, you love a lowkey beach where you can just relax and unwind. Your most aligned beach is Long Beach! Not only is this beach’s vibe laid-back and easygoing, it’s surrounded by tons of amazing restaurants. We all know Taurus loves good food.


Gemini

Gemini, the best beach for you is Santa Monica Beach. The Santa Monica Pier is what makes this beach your best bet to visit. Complete with rides and a Ferris wheel, this beach has no shortage of fun activities, which pairs perfectly with Gemini’s need to stay stimulated!


Cancer

Cancer, you love to be in places that are comfortable and sweet. Hermosa Beach is the beach for you. It’s close to LA, so you don’t have to travel too far away from your treasured home to get here. This beautiful shore will have you feeling happy and healed!


Leo

Leo, you have a knack for gathering attention with your looks and aura, so why not show them off the way you deserve? Bring your beautiful self to Venice Beach, where you can enjoy the gorgeous waves and also connect with gorgeous people!


Virgo

Virgo, a trip to the beach can’t have too much fuss or too many people, that’s why your best beach in Los Angeles is the Will Rogers State Beach! With ample parking and space, this beach isn’t as busy as the bigger beaches, and that’s why it fits right in with your vibe.


Libra

Libra, you need a beach that’s beautiful and allows you to be social. Your most aligned beach is Redondo Beach. With a buzzing pier, highly Instagrammable oceanfront restaurants, and even nightlife, you’ll get all the connection your little Libra heart needs at Redondo Beach!


Scorpio

Scorpio, you appreciate a little privacy when you go out, so you prefer places that are more intimate and serene. You’ll find just what you’re looking for at Puerco State Beach! This beach is quiet and low-profile. Make it your next beach day destination.


Sagittarius

Sagittarius, you need a beach that piques your interest, with multiple things to do and sights to see. That’s why your best beach is Escondido Beach, which is also part of a state park. You can lay out on the sand after hiking, climbing, or seeing the Escondido Falls waterfall!


Capricorn

Capricorn, you have an appreciation for the finer things in life, so you deserve a beach that has a bit of luxury. Manhattan Beach is the place for you. It’s beautiful, but not too bustling, with ample luxury shopping and dining. Give it a visit!


Aquarius

Aquarius, you need a beach that’s just as interesting as you are, but still gives you plenty of room to do more than just lay out. Look no further than Torrance Beach! You can surf, swim, bike, walk, or even fly kites at this beach. The versatility will make you feel right at home.


Pisces

Pisces, your big, beautiful beach is none other than Zuma Beach! There is nothing Pisces values more than ease and flow, and Zuma Beach offers both of those in abundance. With plenty of parking, space, nature, and water, Zuma Beach is definitely made for Pisces.


It’s time to have fun, so get out and go play! And remember to do a little cleanup as you catch your rays and admire the waves. All zodiac signs can do their part to protect our planet!

The Best Los Angeles Beach for Your Zodiac Sign

Amber Jay is an astrologer with over 10 years of astrological research under her belt. She utilizes astrology as a practical tool that is enlightening and freeing, focusing on pulling out the inherent wisdom that lies within all of us. You can find her for regular spiritual and astrological guidance at @AmberJayLightsTheWay on Instagram.

Images include altered photographs from Wikimedia Commons. Support public image libraries.



Thank you to all who rushed to the beaches of Southern California on December 4-5, 2021 and January 2-3, 2022 to help us document the King Tide. Your observations were vital to preparing Los Angeles for a future affected by climate change.

The culminating point of the King Tide gave us a glimpse of what California’s sea-level rise may look like, while the low tide during this phenomenon showed us the gravity of a shifting ocean.

This allowed scientists and the public to observe first-hand the intertidal habitats that are threatened by rapid sea-level rise. These habitats can be observed during normal low tides, but the extra low tide experienced during the event allowed for even more opportunities to observe and explore. During the King Tide, images were captured of threatened sea life, and people getting up close to observe it.

Although the low tide revealed a new view of ecosystems most people don‚Äôt get to see, capturing the high tide was just as important. The USGS has noted that ‚Äúas beaches decrease in height and width with rising seas, the already narrow intertidal zones‚ÄĒsupporting invertebrates that help cycle nutrients by breaking down organic matter‚ÄĒshrink further.‚ÄĚ (How Rising Seas Push Coastal Systems Beyond Tipping Points | U.S. Geological Survey (usgs.gov)).

Images collected during these past King Tide events will not only help illuminate what the future impact of climate change will have on our California communities, but they also bring to light what ecosystems are threatened as climate change moves past the tipping point.

Photos of Santa Monica Pier at the low point during King Tide. Taken by Michelle Zentgraf.



Our winters bring increased rainfall in the Los Angeles region. During this season, when many don’t usually flock to the beach like during warmer months, our Storm Response Team is our ocean’s first responder after major rain events.¬†

Winter Storms in LA

The biggest storm of the 2021-2022 winter season, as of yet, arrived in Southern California on Tuesday, December 14, 2021. ‚ÄúAs far as intensity, it‚Äôs one of our stronger storms,‚ÄĚ Kristan Lund, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service, said in the LA Times. ‚ÄúIt‚Äôs definitely the strongest we‚Äôve seen so far, and potentially one of the stronger ones we‚Äôll see this season.”

While we desperately need the rain to quench our ecosystems, unfortunately it comes with a wave of trash. 

Stormwater is the major source of pollution for rivers, lakes, and ocean in Los Angeles County, California. The first flush from a major rain event brings a flood of water, toxins, debris, and trash from our streets straight onto our beaches through the storm drain system. The untreated runoff eventually dumps pollution onto local shorelines. This waste poses a significant risk for wildlife and marine life who can ingest trash or get entangled, and also for the health of our communities who can get sick from bacteria-polluted water.

Our local waters need your help combating marine debris after every big storm in LA during the winter.

Take Part in a Self-Guided Cleanup

Gather friends and family or go solo to take part in a storm response cleanup by spending 30 minutes to an hour cleaning up around your neighborhood or local outdoor space. Remember, trash removed from a street or park means that less waste will make its way through the storm drain system, onto our beaches, and then out to sea.

In addition to doing a cleanup near you, take a look at the map above and target these beach sites today or this week. Highlighted areas are near storm drain outfalls and usually have the most trash after it rains‚ÄĒso this is where you can make the biggest impact.¬†

Join the Storm Response Team

The rain is coming, are you ready to answer the call?

This won’t be LA’s last storm. Heal the Bay needs more volunteers to join our Storm Response Team for the rainy season to help remove trash, track data, and document photos. If you‚Äôre interested in joining our dedicated Storm Response Team to be the ocean‚Äôs first responder after #LARain, sign up¬†to receive alerts about volunteer opportunities!¬†

Join the Storm Response Team

Already a Storm Response Team Member?

Keep an eye on your email inbox. About 24-hours after each rainfall has ended the Storm Response Team leader will email an alert with the location of the next cleanup. When the storm rolls in, collect your gear and get ready to answer the call! If you need a refresher on how to prepare, what to bring, and how to safely take part, review the most critical storm response information.

Critical Storm Response Information

 

Thanks for Being the Ocean’s First Responder

Whether you joined the Storm Response Team, are in the process of learning more about the issue, or are leading a cleanup of your own soon, THANK YOU!

Share your efforts on social media and encourage friends, family, and your network to get involved by tagging your finds with @healthebay and #healthebay.

 If you have questions about our Storm Response Team, please reach out to Emely Garcia.

 

Special thanks to our sponsor!



Funcionarios electos de Los Angeles est√°n tomando acci√≥n legislativa para reducir la basura que se genera con la comida para llevar tras un gran incremento en el consumo del pl√°stico¬†de un solo uso.¬†¬ŅPero qu√© significa “Deja el desperdicio”?¬†¬ŅY c√≥mo ayuda a luchar contra la contaminaci√≥n por pl√°stico? Vamos a verlo.

Deja el desperdicio es el √ļltimo¬†empuj√≥n legislativo de Heal the Bay junto a la coalici√≥n¬†Reusable LA. #DejaElDesperdicio requerir√≠a que los extras de la comida para llevar y a domicilio¬†‚ÄĒ como los utensilios de un solo uso, popotes, condimentos, servilletas y dem√°s¬†‚ÄĒ fuesen facilitados¬†a petici√≥n¬†del usuario. Si los necesita, los puede tener. Y si no, no hace falta desperdiciar.

A√Īada su nombre a la petici√≥n

El¬†consumo de pl√°stico de un solo uso se ha disparado debido al COVID-19, incluyendo¬†aqu√≠ en Los Angeles, donde nuestros queridos restaurantes locales se han visto forzados a depender principalmente de los pedidos para llevar y a domicilio.¬†El consumo de pl√°sticos de un solo uso se ha incrementado entre un 250% y un 300% desde que comenz√≥ la pandemia, con un aumento de un 30% de basura atribuido en parte a utensilios de usar y tirar.¬†En toda la naci√≥n, billones de accesorios para la comida se tiran cada a√Īo, muchos sin haberse utilizado siquiera. (Muchos de nosotros incluso los guardamos en el¬†temido caj√≥n de los extras,¬†esperando utilizarlos alg√ļn¬†d√≠a).

La amplia mayor√≠a¬†de estos objetos de un solo uso no se pueden reciclar. Suman a la crisis de basura pl√°stica, ensucian nuestros vecindarios, r√≠os, el oc√©ano, y atascan los vertederos. El uso de combustibles f√≥siles¬†para producir objetos de pl√°stico que ni siquiera se usan es lo √ļltimo que necesitamos durante una crisis clim√°tica. Estos efectos tambi√©n¬†presentan problemas de justicia medioambiental, con las comunidades en primera l√≠nea¬†sufriendo desproporcionadamente por el cambio clim√°tico, la extracci√≥n de crudo, y la incineraci√≥n asociada a pl√°sticos de un solo uso.

Heal the Bay y Reusable LA est√°n abogando por legislar #DejaElDesperdicio en la ciudad y el condado de Los Angeles. En Enero de 2021, los miembros del consejo de la ciudad de Los Angeles¬†Paul Koretz y Paul Krekorian introdujeron una moci√≥n¬†para un borrador de ley para #DejaElDesperdicio. Requerir√≠a¬†que¬†en los casos de comida para llevar, servicio a domicilio o servicios de entrega a domicilios de terceros,¬†todos los accesorios estuvieran disponibles √ļnicamente bajo petici√≥n. La Junta de Supervisores del Condado de Los Angeles¬†sigui√≥¬†el ejemplo y en Febrero de 2021¬†pas√≥ una moci√≥n¬†similar de forma un√°nime tras ser introducida por¬†Sheila Kuehl,¬†miembro de la junta.

Esta legislaci√≥n reconoce que los miembros de la comunidad pueden necesitar pajitas/ popotes/pajillas, utensilios y / u otros accesorios para alimentos de un solo uso. Es crucial que los restaurantes y las aplicaciones de entrega de terceros promuevan y brinden opciones para todos. Este modelo “a pedido” est√° estructurado intencionalmente para cumplir con todos los requisitos y adaptaciones de la ADA para garantizar un acceso equitativo para disfrutar f√°cilmente de comidas en el lugar, comida para llevar o entregas en los restaurantes de Los √Āngeles. Seg√ļn esta ordenanza, las empresas pueden proporcionar accesorios para alimentos a los clientes que los soliciten.

Restaurantes y aplicaciones de entrega a domicilio deber√≠an por defecto, no entregar accesorios de un solo uso para los pedidos, a menos que el cliente los solicite. Cambiar a este modelo de accesorios “bajo pedido” elimina basura innecesaria y ahorra dinero a los establecimientos. Los Angeles ha hecho esto antes con los¬†popotes bajo pedido. En un momento en el que los negocios peque√Īos y los restaurantes est√°n¬†luchando por mantenerse a flote, esta es una soluci√≥n¬†simple para recortar costes excesivos y contaminaci√≥n por pl√°stico. Apoyamos estas ordenanzas porque son una soluci√≥n donde todos ganan, las comunidades de LA, los negocios y el medioambiente.

Contamos con su apoyo para pasar esta ordenanza, así que pase a la acción mediante los enlaces de aquí abajo y manténgase a la escucha para más novedades de #DejaElDesperdicio.

Pase a la acción!

Firme la petición

Comparta este post de Instagram

Unase al grupo de Facebook @REUSABLELA

View in English



The Big Beach Cleanup book

The Big Beach Cleanup is a new book written by Charlotte Offsay. Heal the Bay asked the author about her process, discoveries, and single-use swaps at home in this Q&A.


Join Charlotte Offsay & Heal the Bay for a virtual book reading + live animal feeding on Saturday, March 6. 

Learn More


Q: How did you work with Heal the Bay on the book?

A: I first reached out to Heal the Bay in early 2019. I had written The Big Beach Cleanup and was looking to connect with experts regarding fact checking recycling and ocean cleanup facts. I live in Los Angeles and am familiar with the important work that Heal the Bay does to protect our oceans, so I decided to ask for their help. Nancy Shrodes, the Associate Director of Policy & Outreach, kindly agreed to review my manuscript and offer her feedback. Since then numerous staff members at Heal the Bay have continued to offer assistance, including providing input on additional educational materials for the book as well as generously offering to do a live animal feeding at The Big Beach Cleanup virtual launch event!

Q: What inspired you to write about a beach cleanup?

A: One day while walking with my children, I stopped to pick up a piece of trash that was in our way and toss it in a nearby trashcan. Throwing away that piece of trash sparked endless questions from my ever-curious children. They wanted to know where the trash had come from and how it got there in the first place. We ended up in big conversations around pollution and doing our part to protect the planet. It was on that walk that I decided to write an ocean advocacy story featuring little hands joining together to make big change. I went home that day and wrote the first draft of what would eventually become The Big Beach Cleanup!

Q: What was the most interesting thing you learned while working on this book?

A: Honestly the most interesting thing I found is how immune we can become to the things that are right in front of us. I have lived and walked around Los Angeles for a long time. I have also cared about the planet and my environmental footprint for a long time, but it wasn’t until I began working on this book that my eyes really opened to how prevalent our pollution problem is and how frequently it is right in front of me on a daily basis. There is no shortage of trash in Los Angeles, not only on our beaches but right on the streets in my very own neighborhood. On my regular walk with my kids we always find trash, even if we have been picking up trash on that same walk the day before. Things get dropped, trash bags aren’t tied properly and more and more we are finding discarded masks and disposable containers. We really need everyone to join together and make conscious changes in order to tackle this growing problem.

Q: Has the book inspired you to make any single-use plastic swaps at home?

A: Writing this book has encouraged my family to look around our home and evaluate our daily waste. We have been replacing individually wrapped items with bulk sizes and make an effort to use refillable containers whenever possible, we have tried to make choices that avoid plastic containers and to purchase less ‚Äėstuff‚Äô (toys, general excess) overall.

Illustration of people cleaning beach

Q: What do you hope readers will take away from the book?

A: My hope is that The Big Beach Cleanup shows readers that big changes begin with small steps. I hope that readers are inspired to think about the changes they want to see in the world, to know that they can make a difference, and are encouraged to join together with those around them to create those changes. I hope they walk away knowing that their hands matter and are needed.

Q: What is your favorite beach in California?

A: Every summer since my husband was little his family has spent time in Coronado. When I met my husband, I was warmly welcomed into this tradition and I look forward to spending time at the beach on Coronado island every year. Locally though we love to visit Will Rogers State Beach as it is close to where my inlaws live and they are often able to join us there!


CHARLOTTE OFFSAY was born in England, grew up in Boston, and currently lives in Los Angeles with her husband and two small children. Through her work, Charlotte hopes to make children laugh, to inspire curiosity, and to create a magical world her readers can lose themselves in time and time again.

Charlotte’s debut picture book, The Big Beach Cleanup, illustrated by Kate Rewse will be published by Albert Whitman in Spring 2021, followed by How to Return a Monster, illustrated by Rea Zhai releasing Fall 2021 with Beaming Books. A Grandma’s Magic, illustrated by Asa Gilland will be published by Doubleday Books for Young Readers in Spring 2022.

Learn more about Charlotte’s work at charlotteoffsay.com and follow her on Twitter at @COffsay and on Instagram at @picturebookrecommendations.