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Summer is coming to an end, but our #StrawlessSummer Campaign is a pledge you can keep all year round.

We are thrilled to be joined by local businesses like Pono Burger, The Misfit, Ingo’s Tasty Diner, Bareburger Organic, Laurel Tavern, Hermosa Beach Fish Shop, Beckers Bakery & Deli, Brother’s BurritosTallulas and Watermans Safehouse for our “Straws-Upon-Request” campaign. These businesses are leading the way to change consumer behavior across our region.

It’s estimated that Americans use roughly 500 million plastic straws daily – that’s enough to fill up 125 school buses and to wrap around the planet 2.5 times. Because they aren’t readily recyclable, most plastic straws end up in landfills, and the rest wind up polluting the environment. Plastic pollution is a major problem, in fact it’s estimated that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the sea by mass than fish. Skipping the straw is an easy way to make a big difference.

L.A. sucks at times, but we don’t have to! We just launched our new campaign microsite (thanks ZEHNERGROUP). You can take the pledge to go strawless, catch up on the latest straw-related news, share with your friends and find out which local restaurants and bars are going straws-upon-request. If you don’t need a plastic straw, don’t use one! Learn more at lasucks.org.



coastal-cleanup-day-collage-banner-v2-e1500322971809

Regístrese para El Día de la Limpieza Costera 2017

Miles de personas limpiarán las playas, los ríos, los parques, las escuelas, y las cuencas hidrográficas por todo el estado de California (un medio millón de personas por todo el mundo) en el sábado el 16 de septiembre — El Día de la Limpieza Costera, el día del voluntario más grande del mundo.

Es un movimiento global compuesto de las comunidades y las organizaciones locales. Juntos podemos quitar basura y escombros de los hábitats locales, nuestros barrios, y ciudades.

Además de crear un medioambiente más limpio, todo lo que recogerán los voluntarios va estar registrado para concienciar sobre los desafíos de la contaminación. En El Día de la Limpieza Costera 2016, había más que 18.3 millones libras de basura y escombros recogidos en unas horas. ¡La unión hace la fuerza!

Eventbrite - Coastal Cleanup Day 2017


Participe en El Día de la Limpieza Costera

¿Quiere meterse más en El Día de la Limpieza Costera? Hay muchas oportunidades de participar:

  • Capitán del sitio: Ayúdenos a informar los voluntarios, explorar la defensa del agua, y prepárese para el evento del voluntario más grande del mundo. Regístrese.

 

  • Prácticas: Las prácticas son para la gente que ama el mar, defensores de los animales, y los que sueña para agua limpio. Solicite hoy para ganar experiencia en apoyar un evento de voluntario masivo y disfrutar de trabajar con uno de los más fiable (y divertido) fines de lucros en Los Ángeles.

 

  • Colaboración: De realizar las quedadas empresarial, los actividades de fitness en el aire libre y entretenimiento, hasta las ofertas de comida y bebida, hay muchas maneras de participar. Hagamos algo juntos. Contactenos.

 

  • Recaudación de Fondos: Entrege a sus ideas para un nueva campaña creativa de Heal the Bay de crowdfunding. Creemos que albergar un evento de nadar desnuda en el puerto de Santa Mónica es más divertimos que girar un cheque. Inspírese.

 

  • Patrocinios: Ayúdenos en hacer que este evento sea una experiencia inolvidable para los voluntarios. No pierda la oportunidad de ganar buena voluntad para su marca. Contactenos.

 


¿Porque tenemos un Día de la Limpieza Costera?

Explorar las historias y los resultados del Día de la Limpieza Costera, un evento global que está celebrado por todo el estado de California, cuando voluntarios recogen basura y escombros de las playas, los ríos, los arroyos, los parques y los espacios públicos. Contamos todo lo que recogen los voluntarios para concienciar sobre los desafíos de la contaminación. Heal the Bay está orgulloso de coordinar los sitios de limpieza con La Conservación del Mar y La Comision de la Costa de California..

🐟 Comunicado de Prensa para El Día de la Limpieza Costera 2017

🐟 Artículo de lo que se puede esperar de Día de la Limpieza Costera 2017

🐟 Galería Fotográfica del Día de la Limpieza Costera 2016

🐟 Los Resultados del Día de la Limpieza Costera: Global

🐟 Los Resultados del Día de la Limpieza Costera: El Condado de L.A. & Global

🐟 Los Resultados del Día de la Limpieza Costera: El Condado de L.A.



Attention citizen scientists and naturalists, it’s time to charge your mobile devices. Our watershed scientist Katherine Pease is inviting you to BioBlitz with her for a few hours on Saturday, Aug. 26.

Compton Creek is a small gem of green and blue, bisected by noisy freeways, crumbling parking lots, aging shopping malls and a high-rise casino. Amid all this urban scrabble, a soft-bottomed section of the creek thrives.

Most people don’t know this earthen-bottomed half-mile stretch even exists. And some might argue that “gem” is too generous a term for this L.A. River tributary. But we see it as a forgotten jewel – a glimpse of what greater L.A.’s inland waterways used to be and a symbol of what we can hopefully bring back on a larger scale.

There are drooping willow trees, reeds, frogs, swarms of dragonflies, California ground squirrels and even majestic kites (a type of bird) flying overhead. There is also trash, a lot of it, and pollutants that can’t be seen with the naked eye: bacteria, metals and nutrients. But there is that glimmer of hope. Plants and animals persist here, and now it’s our job to find out what’s there and to protect it.

So we’re inviting you to a blitz. A BioBlitz to be exact.

On Saturday, Aug. 26, you can join scientists and experts from Heal the Bay and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in searching for wildlife and documenting it with your smartphone.

We’ll be spending three hours snapping pictures of the local flora and fauna, uploading the images to our growing catalogue of L.A.’s wildlife via the iNaturalist app.

You don’t need to be a scientist to participate – you just have to observe what is around you! In addition to looking for plants and animals, we will be picking up trash in and around the creek, which ultimately drains into the Pacific Ocean near Long Beach.

The data we collect will better inform restoration and revitalization of the Los Angeles River watershed. A revitalization plan for the Lower L.A. River is being formulated by the Lower L.A. River Revitalization Plan Working Group. As a member of this effort, Heal the Bay is fighting for better access, improved water quality and restored ecological habitats in the Lower L.A. River. Having data on the current conditions of biodiversity in Compton Creek helps set a baseline so we can establish goals for what we would like to see in the coming years.

This BioBlitz is part of two greater efforts in the Los Angeles area to document, protect and improve biodiversity and habitats.

First, the Los Angeles City Council, championed by councilmember Paul Koretz, recently passed a motion to protect and improve biodiversity in Los Angeles. Heal the Bay has been involved in this effort and sees this BioBlitz in Compton Creek as a way to understand the nature that exists all around us in greater Los Angeles.

The second push is the city of Compton’s revival of the Compton Creek Task Force. The Task Force is focused on creating stewardship opportunities along the creek, educating residents and visitors about its importance. The group will also help implement the city’s Compton Creek Regional Garden Park Master Plan, which includes restoring the earthen-bottom portion of Compton Creek.

If you ever thought about becoming a citizen scientist, this is an ideal opportunity to get started. Last year, we hosted similar events in the Ballona Wetlands and Malibu Lagoon. Dozens of volunteers made a big difference in our ongoing restoration work by creating a record of what they saw each morning.

You can register with us for the event here.



The Strawless Summer - Heal the Bay

L.A. doesn’t have to suck.

The relentless traffic, all the annoying wannabes, and the really, really long lines for literally everything. (Seriously, I just wanted a cold brew & cronut!) Okay, fine. These things do suck! But, they don’t define us.

Diverse communities, vibrant businesses and a beautiful environment – this is what makes greater L.A. so desirable to call home. From the San Gabriel mountains to the Bay, we are a cultural and economic hub built on creativity, innovation and resilience. But escape from the hustle-and-bustle of undercover celebrities, hashtag fads and trendy avocado toast is only a short trip away. Whether it be to hike on nature trails, shred down mountains, swim in the sea or explore the desert, we are blessed with natural and urban settings that are uniquely intertwined.

Yet, our everyday lifestyle choices are having a negative impact that we can no longer ignore.


(Photo by: Henrique Vicente, Flickr. January 2017.)

Plastic pollution is everywhere.

The consequences and costs of convenience related to single-use plastic packaging for food and beverages are surfacing in our ocean, rivers, creeks and streams. It’s now estimated that by 2050, there will be more plastic in the ocean by mass than fish1.

Plastic drink-related litter is one of the top items we find at our volunteer cleanups in beach and watershed areas across greater Los Angeles. Single-use lids, cups, bottles, sleeves, stirrers, six-pack rings, and straws. You name it, we find it. Our region isn’t the only one that needs to consider rethinking the drink. Some 40% of all debris found in the environment is beverage-related2.

And all this trash isn’t just gross. It’s dangerous. Marine mammals, fish and birds often get entangled in plastic or mistake pieces of it for food. After accumulating our trash in their gullet, the animals can’t digest food properly and often die.

Strawless Summer - Heal the Bay

Just keep sippin’.

Greater L.A. can lead the way and help shift America away from single-use plastic items. We took a giant step when Heal the Bay helped pass the statewide plastic bag ban in 2014 and California voters upheld the policy last year.

But this summer, we’re zeroing in on plastic straws because they kind of suck.

Plastic straws of all shapes, sizes and colors are popping up everywhere from juice boxes to cocktails to unasked-for glasses of water. Collectively, it’s estimated that Americans use roughly 500 million plastic straws daily – enough to fill up 125 school buses each day3 and wrap around our entire planet 2.5 times. Most plastic straws end up in landfills. The rest wind up polluting the environment and posing a threat to animals and aquatic life.

So, here’s what we are asking you to do. It’s simple and it works: If you don’t need a plastic straw, don’t use one!

The Strawless Summer

It is starting to heat up this summer, so now is the perfect time to cool off and skip the single-use plastic straw. We just launched our new destination, lasucks.org, where you can take the pledge to go strawless and share with your friends.


1. The New Plastics Economy Rethinking the future of plastics. January 2016. http://www3.weforum.org/docs/WEF_The_New_Plastics_Economy.pdf
2. Plastics BAN List. Publication. 5 Gyres, Clean Production Action, Surfrider Foundation, USTREAM. 2016. http://d3583ivmhhw2le.cloudfront.net/images/uploads/publications/PlasticsBANList2016.pdf
3. “The Be Straw Free Campaign”. National Park Service Commercial Services. (Last update 11/26/2013) https://www.nps.gov/commercialservices/greenline_straw_free.htm



Snapshot CalCoast 2017
Ever wanted to be a scientist? Now is your chance! The California Academy of Sciences is teaming up with the Marine Protected Area Collaborative Network for Snapshot CalCoast 2017!

From June 23rd-July 2nd, teams across California will head to tide pools in marine protected areas (MPAs) to discover, photograph, and identify intertidal marine species. Put your smartphone to good use, download the iNaturalist app, and become not only a citizen scientist, but a conservation superhero today!

Why Care About Biodiversity?
Biodiversity is at the heart of ecosystem balance. By better understanding and protecting biodiversity, we are taking action toward more effective conservation. Ecosystems that have a higher level of biodiversity are more robust, can more easily bounce back from environmental changes and are generally more sustainable. MPAs in particular have been identified to successfully increase biodiversity, which, in turn, boosts productivity, increases resilience and establishes overall healthier ecosystems.

What is a BioBlitz?
A Bioblitz is a community event in which many people come together to document biodiversity by observing and recording as many species as they can in one area at one time. Bioblitzes are not only fantastic opportunities to get involved in the community, but also to connect you to both nature and science in a positive and rewarding way. Snapshot CalCoast uses the iNaturalist platform to bridge the gap between technology and outdoor nature, connecting social media to conservation and enabling you to share your discoveries through a fun, inspiring, and easy-to-use medium.

Get Involved!
For more information about Snapshot CalCoast and how you can get involved, visit here. See below for a list of bioblitzes happening in the Los Angeles area:

Heal the Bay
Wednesday, June 28
7:30am-9:30am
Point Dume State Park
RSVP here

LA Waterkeeper
Wednesday, June 28
10:00am-1:00pm
Paradise Cove

Wishtoyo Chumash Foundation
Sunday, June 25
6:30am-11:00am
Leo Carrillo State Park
RSVP to Eventbrite required. Spaces are limited.
For more information, please contact: kmelendez@wishtoyo.org, (805) 323-7023

Aquarium of the Pacific, Sea Grant, Terranea Resort
Friday, June 30
7:30am-10:30am
Pelican Cove
RSVP to Eventbrite required. Spaces are limited.

Natural History Museum – LAC
Sunday, June 25 and Monday, June 26
5:00am-8:00am
Point Fermin
RSVP here

Want your own adventure? Head out on your own, or with friends and family! Choose any coastal location between June 23rd and July 2nd, especially within Marine Protected Areas, and share your observations. Be sure to keep an eye out for the animals on the most wanted species list! All information collected will not only help improve knowledge of coastal biodiversity, but also be used by coastal managers to improve conservation efforts. Spread the word, invite your friends and family, and together, let’s make a positive impact and document our beautiful California coast! To learn more about how to use iNaturalist, click here and be sure to share! #SnapshotCalCoast @SnapshotCACoast.



Heal the Bay has found a unique way to draw attention to the new administration’s attack on climate change science – a sea turtle with a ninja star.

The inspiring March for Science at cities around the nation has concluded, but the fight for rationality and reason lives on.

Many scientists and researchers working in the environmental field around the country feel as if they have a bulls-eye painted on their back – from the very government that has funded their important work for decades.

The new federal administration’s plan to curtail climate change research and to slash funding for the Environmental Protection Agency has stoked deep concerns in the nonprofit world.

But Heal the Bay isn’t sitting by quietly. We’re getting quite animated about the issue – literally.

Today, we launched a 60-second PSA to rally digital advocates across the country to petition their Congressional representatives to oppose proposed budget cuts to EPA programs and staff. Public dissent is critical to ensure that essential air- and water-quality safeguards and habitat protections are not abandoned by climate deniers sitting in positions of federal power.

Heal the Bay’s partners in the advertising and animation industries shaped the spot, dubbed “Nature’s Revolt,” as part of a new creative coalition called Our Next 4 Years. Ironically riffing on over-the-top TV cartoon violence, the video offers a humorous take on marine animals fighting fire with fire.

Sarah May Bates, a veteran creative director in the advertising agency world, served as writer and art director on the spot, working with Matthew King, Heal the Bay’s communications director. Scott Graham provided animation, storyboards and character designs. (Full credits are below.)

“Climate change is a huge downer, but the EPA plays an essential role in sustaining this planet in the face of it,” Bates said. “To make a dire message more palatable, we imagined a scenario in which nature could fight back. At the very least, a crab with a rocket launcher can make an important message more engaging.”

Heal the Bay asks “Nature’s Revolt” viewers to take action and add their name to the Change.org/ProtectOurOceans petition seeking continued funding for climate programs at the EPA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. To date, nearly 75,000 ocean-lovers have added their signatures to the Heal the Bay-sponsored petition, covering every state and major overseas territory in the United States.


 

 


Bates previously collaborated with Heal the Bay on “The Majestic Plastic Bag,” the BBC-style nature mockumentary that has been viewed more than 2.3 million times on YouTube, and featured in environmental conferences and classrooms around the world.

Our Next 4 Years is a collective of nearly 300 animation professionals (Emmy- and Oscar- nominees among them) who are donating their creative talents to produce animated PSAs for progressive causes that will be negatively impacted by policies put forth by the current administration.

“For each attempt to roll back hard fought social and economic gains won over the past 70 years, we will fight back with messages to help stem the regressive tide,” said Mike Blum, owner of boutique animation studio Pipsqueak Films. He is one of the co-founders of Our Next 4 Years, along with veteran animation producer Carolyn Bates.

Production teams are matched with other nonprofits to create virtual animation studios in order to tackle causes, including the environment, immigrant rights, affordable health-care, government reform and religious tolerance.

“So often, animated PSAs are out of reach of charities and community organizations, because we move fast and don’t have the long lead time that many animation houses insist on,” said Jayde Lovell, director of film and video for March for Science. “But working with Our Next 4 Years was incredible. They really brought our ideas to life in meaningful, funny and emotional pieces in a week’s time!”

The coalition has debuted eleven videos to date, including “Nature’s Revolt.” In just a few days, the four videos they released in time for Earth Day and March for Science have a combined reach of more than 600,000 people on Facebook. You can watch other videos here.

Full Credits: “Nature’s Revolt”

Animation, Storyboard & Character Designs:
Scott Graham, ScottGraham.carbonmade.com

Creative Director/Writer:
Sarah May Bates, SarahMayBates.com

Backgrounds:
Carolyn Arabascio

Animal Character Designs:
Regie Miller, MyNameIsRegie.com

Text Animation:
Daniela Fernandes Smith

Music:
Jeremy Simon, FurnivalMusic.com

Producer:
Carolyn Bates

Production:
Our Next 4 Years



In honor of Earth Day, we break down the three biggest challenges our seas are facing and outline practical steps you can take to help turn the tide.

Sip smarter

Here’s a troubling thought: It’s estimated that there will be more plastic by mass than fish in the world’s oceans by 2050. In the last 30 years, our volunteers have removed more than 2 million pounds of trash from our shores – that’s the weight of two fully loaded 747 passenger jets! Drink related trash forms the bulk of man-made debris found at Heal the Bay cleanups, accounting for 36% of all items found on L.A. County beaches.

This summer, Heal the Bay is launching its “Rethink the Drink” campaign, but you can get started today by saying “No thanks” to single-use straws, plastic water bottles, coffee lids and beverage cups. And do your part by signing up for one of our monthly beach cleanups.

Change the climate

Here’s another disturbing thought: L.A. County could lose more than half of its beaches by 2100 due to coastal erosion related to warming seas, according to a just-released study from the U.S. Geological Survey. Reducing our carbon footprint is a complicated endeavor involving multi-national agreements, but there are easy steps you can take in your daily life to reduce your impact on the sea. Transportation and food choices are an obvious place to start as a consumer. If you own a car, try taking public transit once a week. If you aren’t a vegetarian, think about skipping meat one day a week.

Heal the Bay also encourages you to speak out against proposed federal budget cuts that would drastically slash the Environmental Protection Agency’s climate research. Read more about how essential the EPA is to our work and sign our petition.


Exposed bedrock on the beach, below the University of California, Santa Barbara. (Credit: Daniel Hoover, U.S. Geological Survey.)

Fishing for answers

Approximately 90% of fish stocks of large predatory fish like tuna have disappeared globally, and more than half of all fish stocks have been maximized. That means we should all opt for sustainable seafood and eat lower down on the ocean food chain. There is much more to fine sea-dining than tuna, salmon and halibut! Widen your palate and the ocean will thank you. Check out Monterey Bay Aquarium’s seafood guide so you can make ocean-friendly choices when eating from the sea. And visit the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium to learn more about our local marine animals and habitats.

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If you really want to get your activist on this Earth Day, please join staff and supporters Saturday morning in downtown L.A. for the national March for Science.



UPDATE: On May 8, Culver City’s City Council voted unanimously to adopt the single-use polystyrene ban. The ban goes into effect on November 8, 2017.


Earlier this week, the City of Culver City took the first step to join other local municipalities to pass a ban on two types of plastics which wreak havoc on marine life and are often used by food providers: polystyrene foam (commonly known as Stryofoam™) and oriented polystyrene.

Polystyrene foam is frequently used in take-out food packaging like cups and to-go boxes. It’s very lightweight and often flies away from trash bins and landfills. Oriented polystyrene (aka solid polystyrene) is used to make items like utensils, lids and food packaging.

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Polystyrene is seldom recycled due to its low quality and value, even though it’s designated with recycling code 6.

As a result, both types of polystyrene are ubiquitous at beach and watershed cleanups. According to Heal the Bay’s Marine Debris Database, our volunteers have picked up 504,832 Styrofoam™ items from beaches in L.A. County in the last 10 years. Banning these specific plastics is a big win for our coastal environment, especially considering Culver City is situated within the watershed of Ballona Creek and its downstream wetland habitat.

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Santa Monica started banning polystyrene ten years ago, and there continues to be talk of a ban on a state-wide level. But now Culver City has the bragging rights. This local municipality courageously chose to adopt some of the most stringent policies in the area by banning polystyrene coffee lids and straws from businesses as well.

The Culver City ban will begin on November 8, 2017, giving local businesses time to run through their current stock and prepare for the changes. According to the Culver City ordinance, no food provider shall use, distribute, or sell any single-use foam polystyrene or polystyrene service ware, denoted by recycling identification code 6 (PS).

In an additional and welcome caveat to the ordinance, Culver City businesses now must first ask if you want cutlery before simply throwing in plastic utensils with your take-out food. This idea works hand in hand with Heal the Bay’s Rethink the Drink campaign—coming soon to a neighborhood near you.

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Ballona Creek Renaissance lead the charge on this effort, with multiple Surfrider chapters reliably showing up in force over the nearly year-long endeavor. Our own Gnarly Beach Cleaner, Michael Doshi, was consistently there for the countless council and sustainability sub-committee meetings, while recent Heal the Bay Super Healer award winner, environmental science educator, and Team Marine leader at Santa Monica High School Benjamin Kay was present to seal the deal on Tuesday, April 11 right before midnight.

If there was one loser in this endeavor it would have to be impromptu beach parties.  Starting in November, “No [Culver] City business shall sell polystyrene coolers.” So in light of this, Heal the Bay recommends you simply do not procrastinate in the planning of those.

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Climate change is real. We could lose two-thirds of our beaches in L.A. by 2100, writes Heal the Bay vice president Sarah Sikich.

As a surfer, scientist, and unabashed fan of romanticized sunset walks on the beach, my heart sunk as my news feed was blasted with a double whammy of bad beach news this week.

First, the White House declared war against the smart climate change policies enacted by the previous administration, which served to protect our communities and the economy. Second, the U.S. Geological Survey unveiled a report that projects that Southern California could lose up to two-thirds of its beaches by 2100 due to climate-related sea-level rise. We cannot afford to move backwards with climate policy when now, more than ever, public health and our environment need proactive solutions to mitigate against and adapt to negative impacts related to rising temperatures.

Los Angeles is known for its beaches. They fuel tourism in the region and provide Angelenos a place to breath, relax, and take in the horizon – offering a break from the buzz and stress of city life. But, these beaches also buffer our coastal communities from the incoming tide and pounding waves. With sea level rise projections of up to 6.5 feet by 2100, eroded beaches would give way to flooding in low-lying neighborhoods, such as Wilmington and Venice. Floods would do damage to coastal infrastructure, like PCH and water treatment plants, pump stations, and other structures that service our communities. A detailed report came out last month from USC Sea Grant that projects detailed impacts from sea level rise along the entire Los Angeles County coastline, and the projections are even starker with the new USGS study released this week.


Exposed bedrock on a beach near Santa Barbara. Daniel Hoover, U.S. Geological Survey

The best way to prepare our coastal communities is to invest in strong climate policy in two ways: mitigating the impacts of climate change by curbing emissions, and by buffering our built and natural environments through adaptation measures that help protect against climate change impacts already underway.

These measures work best when the natural environment is enhanced through measures like dune restoration, protecting and restoring kelp forests, and beach nourishment. And, as demonstrated by the USGS study, agency research is a critical part of the process. Unwinding climate policies and gutting budgets for EPA and NOAA — key agencies that invest in climate research and preparedness — will only leave us with our heads in the sand, drowning from the rising seas.

The good news is that research, planning, and management measures can be put into place to help curb the impacts from sea-level rise. But, the longer we wait, the more difficult it will be to take meaningful action. Now is the time to double down on efforts to prepare and defend our coastlines. Please join Heal the Bay and our supporters in making your voice heard by signing our petition calling for funds to be maintained for climate programs in both NOAA and EPA. More than 70,000 ocean lovers and science believers have joined the call. Please add your voice.

Some comments from our supporters around the nation:

“I’m signing because I believe in science. Climate change is real, and our planet is in peril.” – Andrea from Mill Valley, CA

“These cuts in funding are directly against our country’s and humanity’s best interests.” – Floyd from Anchorage, AK

“The EPA is indispensable – I want myself, my family, my community, my country and my planet to be protected!” – Meg from Salt Lake City, UT

“Any proposed reduction in funding for the EPA and NOAA will adversely affect the U.S.’s ability to combat climate change in ways that we cannot afford.” – Elizabeth from Dallas, TX



california earth month and earth day with heal the bay

L: South Bay. C: Underwater in SoCal by Chris DeLorenzo. R: Rocky Point at Mugu Beach.

Our excitement for Earth Day can’t be contained to just 24 hours – that’s why we’re celebrating our environment all month long. Of course it goes without saying, every month is Earth Month at Heal the Bay, but April will be something else altogether.

This month, Heal the Bay is involved in over 40 different events and programs all over Los Angeles County. From an epic sandcastle competition to our monthly beach cleanup, to exciting new activities at the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium — below are the best science, art, and educational events to celebrate a clean and thriving ocean this April.

So choose your path, have fun, learn something new, and make a wave with us all month long to protect what we love.

Featured Earth Month Events

Protect What You Love Sandcastle Competition

Unleash your inner architect! Builders are wanted for a friendly competition with Heal the Bay and the Boys & Girls Club to design some amazing sandcastles in celebration of Earth Month. Do you have what it takes to work on the sandy shores while curious beach cleanup volunteers stand by?
When: April 15, 8:30-11:30am
Where: Santa Monica Beach near Lifeguard Tower 1550
Sign Up


Nothin’ But Sand Beach Cleanup

UPDATE: Amazing! This Earth Month event is totally maxed out. Lots more to sea hare… eh hem… see here:

-Hop on over to the beach cleanup at Ballona Creek on Earth Day.

-Help out Pacoima Beautiful at a cleanup in the City of San Fernando on Earth Day.

-Come to our volunteer orientation in April to learn more about all the opportunities to give back with Heal the Bay.

-Sign up for our beach cleanup in May.

Do you like dirty beaches? NO!? Then, one of these buckets has your name on it. In April, we’re gathering in full force to sweep Santa Monica Beach clean and leave behind Nothin’ But Sand. This is a great opportunity for families and friends to volunteer for good cause. Feel free to saunter on over to the nearby Sandcastle Competition and gaze upon the sandy constructions. Participants also earn free admission to the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium that afternoon, and with it the chance to interact with the local animals that call our Bay home.
When: April 15, 10am-12pm
Where: Santa Monica Beach near Lifeguard Tower 1550
RSVP


March for Science on Earth Day with Heal the Bay

H2O is life! The rest is just science. As a science-based organization, we know that scientific literacy drives informed decision-making. That’s why on Earth Day we are marching for science in Los Angeles — joining hundreds of other locations worldwide and thousands of scientists and advocates — because the threats to our local waters and waterways are real and must be addressed scientifically.
When: Earth Day, April 22, 9am-12:30pm
Where: Pershing Square, 532 South Olive Street, Los Angeles, CA 90013
See More


Earth Day at Santa Monica Pier Aquarium

Thanks to our friends at The Albright, admission to the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium will be free on Earth Day! It will be chock-full of eco-friendly activities down at the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium. Make a biodegradable planter, enjoy a special Earth Day story time followed by live animal presentation, join in our interactive “Who Pollutes?” presentation, and check out the local fauna.
When: Earth Day, April 22, 12:30pm-5pm
Where: Santa Monica Pier Aquarium
See More


“Breath of Disruption” Exhibit by Chris DeLorenzo at Gallery 169

Gallery 169, the “hub + cultural generator” of Santa Monica Canyon, is hosting an exhibit “Breath of Disruption” by LA/NY based photographer Chris DeLorenzo. The collection features beautiful, abstract photos taken under waves along the Southern California coast. Gallery entry is free. Best of all, 10% of proceeds from artwork sales support Heal the Bay. See a fresh interview with Chris DeLorenzo.
When: April 8, 5-8pm (Artist meet and greet with Chris DeLorenzo from 5-5:30pm)
Where: 169 W Channel Rd, Santa Monica, CA 90402
See More


Spring Break Camp at the Aquarium

In honor of Earth Month, our campers will have fun becoming Planet Protectors as they explore the ocean through games, crafts, animal interactions, beach investigations, and science experiments.
When: April 10–14, 9am–2pm daily
Where: Santa Monica Pier Aquarium
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Malibu Library Speaker Series Presents Dr. Sylvia Earle

The April 2017 Malibu Library Speaker Series has a special treat in store for Earth Month. Dr. Sylvia A. Earle, world renowned oceanographer, explorer, author, diver, and former chief scientist of NOAA (among many, many other brilliant things) will speak about her extraordinary experiences.
When: Wednesday, April 12, 7pm
Where: Elkins Auditorium, Pepperdine University
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Aquarium Volunteer Open House

Learn about all our amazing volunteer and internship opportunities at the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium, requirements to join our volunteer and intern teams, and Aquarium expectations, as well as all the great benefits the Aquarium has to offer our volunteers and interns.
When: April 13, 6-6:45pm
Where: Santa Monica Pier Aquarium
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The City Nature Challenge 2017

Even in urban settings the natural environment is all around us, sometimes hidden in plain sight. Exploring and documenting nature in cities is critical, which is why we rely on citizen science to sustain and grow our knowledge. What better way to celebrate National Citizen Science Day on 4/15 than to rep Los Angeles in the the City Nature Challenge 2017? Roll up your sleeves, whip out your cellphone or camera, and go for a walk outside to help Los Angeles get smarter about its natural environment. Over a dozen U.S. cities are competing to see who can observe the most nature from 4/14-4/18. PS – When you are documenting species, please be mindful not to disturb the wildlife and habitat.
When: April 14-18
Where: Everywhere in L.A.! No, really.
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Heal the Bay’s Volunteer Orientation

Get an introduction to Heal the Bay, our current issues, and how you can get involved in one of our many exciting volunteer programs. Founded on the principle that one person can make a difference, we’ve empowered thousands of volunteers to improve their environment and communities. Now you can make a difference too.
When: April 17, 7pm-9pm
Where: Heal the Bay main office, 1444 9th St, Santa Monica, CA 90401
RSVP


Earth Focus: “Vanishing Coral” Documentary

Tune in for the latest episode of EARTH FOCUS, a television program that reflects on Earth’s changing resources and climates and how it affects people, animals, and habitats all over the world. This installment explores the story of scientists and naturalists who are working with local communities to protect coral reefs that are facing imminent danger from warmer seas, pollution, and unsustainable fishing practices. 
When: April 18, 8:30pm
Where: Your couch or on the go via: KCET in Southern California, Link TV Nationwide. Also streaming at KCET.org/Coral and LinkTV.org/Coral.


Ella Fitzgerald’s 100th Birthday

We’re thrilled to celebrate Ella Fitzgerald’s “would-be” 100th birthday at the Santa Monica Pier Aquarium. There will be Ella-themed decor and music, and the chance to feed some sea stars in honor of one of our favorite stars. The Ella Fitzgerald Charitable Foundation has been an amazing partner to Heal the Bay for the past 7 years, providing assistance in educating over 7,760 students about protecting the ocean.
When: April 25, 2-5pm
Where: Santa Monica Pier Aquarium
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LA2050 #EarthMonthLA Pledge

Did you know Los Angeles has an ambitious goal of becoming the healthiest place to live by the year 2050? Metrics like sourcing local water, utilizing public transportation and reducing air toxins are all being tracked so we can see our progress and reach our target. What better time to reflect on creating a more resilient LA than Earth Month? Take LA2050’s Earth Month Pledge with us and learn more about our 2050 goal.
When: All Month Long
Where: Anywhere
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If you can’t make it to any of our events in April, you can still make your voice heard by signing our petition urging Congress to maintain EPA & NOAA funding. Keep the Earth Month party going in May, and reserve your seat for our annual awards gala at the Santa Monica Pier. Don’t miss out! This exclusive seaside experience happens just once-a-year and goes a long way towards our mission to make Greater L.A.’s coastal waters and watersheds safe, healthy, and clean.